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What is RESEARCH ETHICS? What does RESEARCH ETHICS mean? RESEARCH ETHICS meaning & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WANT VIDEO LIKE THIS ONE? ORDER IT HERE FROM INDUSTRY EXPERTS - http://bit.ly/2Uxpg5X ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is RESEARCH ETHICS? What does RESEARCH ETHICS mean? RESEARCH ETHICS meaning - RESEARCH ETHICS definition - RESEARCH ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Research ethics involves the application of fundamental ethical principles to a variety of topics involving research, including scientific research. These include the design and implementation of research involving human experimentation, animal experimentation, various aspects of academic scandal, including scientific misconduct (such as fraud, fabrication of data and plagiarism), whistleblowing; regulation of research, etc. Research ethics is most developed as a concept in medical research. The key agreement here is the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki. The Nuremberg Code is a former agreement, but with many still important notes. Research in the social sciences presents a different set of issues than those in medical research. The academic research enterprise is built on a foundation of trust. Researchers trust that the results reported by others are sound. Society trusts that the results of research reflect an honest attempt by scientists and other researchers to describe the world accurately and without bias. But this trust will endure only if the scientific community devotes itself to exemplifying and transmitting the values associated with ethical research conduct. There are many ethical issues to be taken into serious consideration for research. Sociologists need to be aware of having the responsibility to secure the actual permission and interests of all those involved in the study. They should not misuse any of the information discovered, and there should be a certain moral responsibility maintained towards the participants. There is a duty to protect the rights of people in the study as well as their privacy and sensitivity. The confidentiality of those involved in the observation must be carried out, keeping their anonymity and privacy secure. As pointed out in the BSA for Sociology, all of these ethics must be honoured unless there are other overriding reasons to do so - for example, any illegal or terrorist activity. Research ethics in a medical context is dominated by principlism, an approach that has been criticised as being decontextualised. Research ethics is different throughout different types of educational communities. Every community has its own set of morals. In Anthropology research ethics were formed to protect those who are being researched and to protect the researcher from topics or events that may be unsafe or may make either party feel uncomfortable. It is a widely observed guideline that Anthropologists use especially when doing ethnographic fieldwork. Research informants participating in individual or group interviews as well as ethnographic fieldwork are often required to sign an informed consent form which outlines the nature of the project. Informants are typically assured anonymity and will be referred to using pseudonyms. There is however growing recognition that these formal measures are insufficient and do not necessarily warrant a research project 'ethical'. Research with people should therefore not be based solely on dominant and de-contextualised understandings of ethics, but should be negotiated reflexively and through dialogue with participants as a way to bridge global and local understandings of research ethics. In Canada, there are many different types of research ethic boards that approve applications for research projects. The most common document that Canadian Universities follow is the Tri-Council Policy Statement. However, there are other types of documents geared towards different educational aspects such as: biology, clinical practices, bio-technics and even stem cell research. The Tri-Council is actually the top three government grant agencies in Canada. If one was to do research in Canada and apply for funds, their project would have to be approved by the Tri-Council. Furthermore, it is the researchers ethical responsibility to not harm the humans they are studying, they also have a responsibility to science, and the public, as well as to future students.
Views: 17982 The Audiopedia
6 the five ethical principles
 
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http://my.brainshark.com/6-the-five-ethical-principles-514742210 -
Views: 39156 John Maggio
Medical Ethics 2 - The Four Principles - Prima Facie Autonomy, Beneficence, NonMaleficence & Justice
 
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Medical Ethics Lecture Series Four Principles "Prima Facie" 1. Autonomy 2. Beneficence 3. Non-Maleficence 4. Justice Medical Lectures and OSCE Videos produced by GMC registered/Certified Doctors. JHP Medical website provides access to online questions, videos and lecture notes. Lectures cover definitions, aetiology, symptoms, clinical features, management, prognosis and complications of a wide variety of medical topics. Also covered are medical statistics, ethics and law. Authors: 1. Dr. A. Hart-Pinto MBChB (Hons) BSc (Hons) 2. Dr. Najeebah Jaunbocus MBChB MRCGP Lectures are recommended for the following audience: Medical students, nursing students, physician assistants, nursing consultants, nursing staff, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, paramedics, first responders, EMT. Lectures cover high yield topics for the following: Medical Finals, Nursing examinations, USMLE, MRCS, MRCP, MRCGP, MCAT, Medical School Interviews, MCAT, PLAB, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, MCCEE, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP.
Views: 22865 JHP Medical UK
What is ACCOUNTING ETHICS? What does ACCOUNTING ETHICS mean? ACCOUNTING ETHICS meaning & explanation
 
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What is ACCOUNTING ETHICS? What does ACCOUNTING ETHICS mean? ACCOUNTING ETHICS meaning - ACCOUNTING ETHICS definition -ACCOUNTING ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Accounting ethics is primarily a field of applied ethics and is part of business ethics and human ethics, the study of moral values and judgments as they apply to accountancy. It is an example of professional ethics. Accounting introduced by Luca Pacioli, and later expanded by government groups, professional organizations, and independent companies. Ethics are taught in accounting courses at higher education institutions as well as by companies training accountants and auditors. Due to the diverse range of accounting services and recent corporate collapses, attention has been drawn to ethical standards accepted within the accounting profession. These collapses have resulted in a widespread disregard for the reputation of the accounting profession. To combat the criticism and prevent fraudulent accounting, various accounting organizations and governments have developed regulations and remedies for improved ethics among the accounting profession. The nature of the work carried out by accountants and auditors requires a high level of ethics. Shareholders, potential shareholders, and other users of the financial statements rely heavily on the yearly financial statements of a company as they can use this information to make an informed decision about investment. They rely on the opinion of the accountants who prepared the statements, as well as the auditors that verified it, to present a true and fair view of the company. Knowledge of ethics can help accountants and auditors to overcome ethical dilemmas, allowing for the right choice that, although it may not benefit the company, will benefit the public who relies on the accountant/auditor's reporting. Most countries have differing focuses on enforcing accounting laws. In Germany, accounting legislation is governed by "tax law"; in Sweden, by "accounting law"; and in the United Kingdom, by the "company law". In addition, countries have their own organizations which regulate accounting. For example, Sweden has the Bokföringsnämden (BFN - Accounting Standards Board), Spain the Instituto de Comtabilidad y Auditoria de Cuentas (ICAC), and the United States the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB).
Views: 6966 The Audiopedia
Ethical Meaning
 
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Video shows what ethical means. Of or relating to the study of ethics.. Of or relating to the accepted principles of right and wrong, especially those of some organization or profession.. Morally approvable, when referring to an action that affects others; good.. Ethical Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say ethical. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 4407 SDictionary
Ethics vs Morality (Philosophical Distinctions)
 
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An explication of the common distinction drawn between ethics and morality and the use of these terms in the discipline of philosophy. Information for this video gathered from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and more! Information for this video gathered from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and more! (#Ethics #Morality)
Views: 219448 Carneades.org
Moral Standards vs Non-Moral Standards - General Ethics - PHILO-notes Whiteboard Edition
 
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This video briefly discusses the difference between moral standards and non-moral standards, and specifically answers the question, "Why the need to distinguish moral standards from non-moral ones?"
Views: 8361 PHILO-notes
Business Ethics Lecture/Lesson/Definition: An Introduction and History Lesson
 
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This Business Ethics Lesson introduces and defines business ethics concepts such as principles, morals, values, social responsibility, along with a brief history of business ethics in the 1960s, business ethics in the 1970s, business ethics in the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s up to more recent trends. Business Ethics Enron, Safe at Any Speed by Ralph Nadar, Religion, Lehman brothers, business ethics profits, consumers' bill of rights, the Defense Industry Initiative on Business Ethics and Conduct (DII), The Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations (FSGO), Sarbanes-Oxley Act, Ethical Culture http://www.subjectmoney.com http://www.subjectmoney.com/articledisplay.php?title=Business%20Ethics:%20The%20History,%20Emergence%20and%20the%20Importance%20of%20Business%20Ethics
Views: 111009 Subjectmoney
[Must watch] Ethical Principles of Interpreting
 
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Access the rest of our learning materials here: http://tinyurl.com/LadonLibrary In this video, you will learn the ethical principles of providing language support. Let's watch and see what PICCA means! Note: Failure to comply with these guidelines may lead to suspension.
Views: 1196 Ladon Language Team
What is COMMUNICATION ETHICS? What does COMMUNICATION ETHICS mean? COMMUNICATION ETHICS meaning
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is COMMUNICATION ETHICS? What does COMMUNICATION ETHICS mean? COMMUNICATION ETHICS meaning - COMMUNICATION ETHICS definition - COMMUNICATION ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Communication ethics is the notion that an individual's or group's behavior are governed by their morals which in turn affects communication. Generally speaking communication ethics deals with the moral good present in any form of human communication. This includes interpersonal communication, mass mediated communication, and digital communication. Communication ethics concerns not only the individual, but is of great concern to businesses, corporations, and professional entities. A business with unethical communication practices is not as effective as one with ethical communication practices. For example, a business with unethical communication practices may withhold evidence that it is harming the environment or breaking a law through a lack of transparence; while a business with ethical communication practices will immediately press a release to the affected parties. In this example, transparency makes the business more effective because it notifies its clients, prospective or established, providers/suppliers, or other affiliates of the potential environmental hazard or law violation. In other words, in this example, transparency will encourage trust and good faith, that the effective business will not conceal what is in the interest of its audience. For the sake of counterexample, there may be a time when censorship is the more effective business practice: take the case of trade secrets, when a design method or management tactic is not openly revealed in the name of competitive advantage; or when terms of agreement/use that a business may have with a service provider forbids transparency. In the latter counterexample, a business may use social media to advertise, but the social media service provider may limit the conduct of its users. Here, if the business considers social media to be a valuable service to achieve its advertising, it may have to censor its product or service to preserve its agreement with the social media provider. Communication ethics is also a division of the NCA (National Communication Association) which was established by Western Michigan University in 1985, as well the NCA has adopted a Credo for Ethical Communication. The Communication Ethics Conference has been held every year for the last 13 years, and has various speakers from Communication Studies backgrounds.
Views: 11962 The Audiopedia
Welcome to Ethics (overview of ethical principles, etc.)
 
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This video describes what happens in my class and some of what you experience when reading an introductory ethics book. After watching this video, you will have a basic understanding of each ethical theory including the major ethical theories of Utilitarianism, Deontology, and Virtue Ethics. If you are in my class, this video is a roadmap to the course. In Week 1, we start with logic. For the next few weeks, we cover one ethical principle each week. For 3 of those weeks, we cover three wisdom traditions. For more, visit my ethics course at https://lucidphilosophy.com
Views: 4503 teachphilosophy
Ethical Dilemma of Principles For UPSC CSE
 
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In this lesson we learn about the basic concepts and key points that will help one ace Ethics, Integrity, and Aptitude for UPSC CSE. Ethics as a subject has its roots in Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology and Public Administration. You can watch the entire course - Ethical Dilemma of Principles here:- https://goo.gl/xAlOZ7 Download the Unacademy Learning App from the Google Play Store here:- https://goo.gl/02OhYI Discuss the course with fellow aspirants here:- https://goo.gl/pdmI1i
Views: 6191 Unacademy
Research Ethics - Ethical Principles (par 2 of 3)
 
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Dr Helen Kara, NCRM visiting fellow, in the second (of three) part of the ‘Research ethics: theory and practice’ NCRM online course. This video is part of the online learning resources from the National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM). To access the supporting materials (presentation slides, datasets, recommended reading, links to related publications and resources) visit https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/resources/online/research_ethics_theory_and_practice/
Views: 1844 NCRMUK
PHILOSOPHY - Ethics: Utilitarianism, Part 1 [HD]
 
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In this Wireless Philosophy video, Julia Markovits (Cornell University) gives an introduction to the moral theory of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism is the view that the right moral action is the one that maximizes happiness for all. This is the first video in a three part series. Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGDk23Q0S9E Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoCuVa9UeR4 Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/Fjql/
Views: 499138 Wireless Philosophy
What is INTEGRITY? What does INTEGRITY mean? INTEGRITY meaning, definition & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ STUDENT PAPER ASSIGNMENTS DONE BY ACADEMY WRITERS. We write your papers - you get TOP GRADES! Check us out and ORDER your plagiarism-free papers with free revisions and money back guarantee - https://extraessay.com?key_wpg=c8ce723fad1d07be0b01e85b83860629 ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is INTEGRITY?What does INTEGRITY mean? INTEGRITY meaning -INTEGRITY pronunciation - INTEGRITY definition - INTEGRITY explanation - How to pronounce INTEGRITY? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Integrity is the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles; moral uprightness. It is generally a personal choice to uphold oneself to consistent moral and ethical standards. In ethics, integrity is regarded by many people as the honesty and truthfulness or accuracy of one's actions. Integrity can stand in opposition to hypocrisy, in that judging with the standards of integrity involves regarding internal consistency as a virtue, and suggests that parties holding within themselves apparently conflicting values should account for the discrepancy or alter their beliefs. The word integrity evolved from the Latin adjective integer, meaning whole or complete. In this context, integrity is the inner sense of "wholeness" deriving from qualities such as honesty and consistency of character. As such, one may judge that others "have integrity" to the extent that they act according to the values, beliefs and principles they claim to hold. Significant attention is given to the subject of integrity in law and the conception of law in 20th century philosophy of law and jurisprudence centering in part on the research of Ronald Dworkin as studied in his book Law's Empire. Dworkin's position on integrity in law reinforces the conception of justice viewed as fairness. A value system's abstraction depth and range of applicable interaction may also function as significant factors in identifying integrity due to their congruence or lack of congruence with observation. A value system may evolve in a while, while retaining integrity if those who espouse the values account for and resolve inconsistencies.
Views: 55604 The Audiopedia
Kant & Categorical Imperatives: Crash Course Philosophy #35
 
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Our next stop on our tour of ethics is Kant’s ethics. Today Hank explains hypothetical and categorical imperatives, the universalizability principle, autonomy, and what it means to treat people as ends-in-themselves, rather than as mere means. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- All other images and video either public domain or via VideoBlocks, or Wikimedia Commons, licensed under Creative Commons BY 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1290542 CrashCourse
What is DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS? What does DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS mean? DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS meaning
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WANT VIDEO LIKE THIS ONE? ORDER IT HERE FROM INDUSTRY EXPERTS - http://bit.ly/2IlNl98 ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS? What does DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS mean? DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS meaning - DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS definition - DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Deontological ethics or deontology (from Greek ????, deon, "obligation, duty") is the normative ethical position that judges the morality of an action based on rules. It is sometimes described as "duty-" or "obligation-" or "rule-" based ethics, because rules "bind you to your duty." Deontological ethics is commonly contrasted to consequentialism, virtue ethics, and pragmatic ethics. In this terminology, action is more important than the consequences. The term deontological was first used to describe the current, specialised definition by C. D. Broad in his book, Five Types of Ethical Theory, which was published in 1930. Older usage of the term goes back to Jeremy Bentham, who coined it in c. 1826 to mean more generally "the knowledge of what is right and proper". The more general sense of the word is retained in French, especially in the term code de déontologie "ethical code", in the context of professional ethics. Deontology is the study of that which is an "obligation or duty," and consequent moral judgment on the actor on whether he or she has complied. In philosophy and religion, states Bocheński, there is an important distinction between deontic and epistemic authority. A typical example of epistemic authority, explains Anna Brożek, is "the relation of a teacher to his students; a typical example of deontic authority is the relation between an employer and his employee." A teacher has epistemic authority when making declarative sentences that the student presumes is reliable knowledge and appropriate but feels no obligation to accept or obey; in contrast, an employer has deontic authority in the act of issuing an order that the employee is obliged to accept and obey regardless of its reliability or appropriateness. Immanuel Kant's theory of ethics is considered deontological for several different reasons. First, Kant argues that to act in the morally right way, people must act from duty (deon). Second, Kant argued that it was not the consequences of actions that make them right or wrong but the motives of the person who carries out the action. Kant's argument that to act in the morally right way one must act purely from duty begins with an argument that the highest good must be both good in itself and good without qualification. Something is "good in itself" when it is intrinsically good, and "good without qualification", when the addition of that thing never makes a situation ethically worse. Kant then argues that those things that are usually thought to be good, such as intelligence, perseverance and pleasure, fail to be either intrinsically good or good without qualification. Pleasure, for example, appears not to be good without qualification, because when people take pleasure in watching someone suffer, this seems to make the situation ethically worse. He concludes that there is only one thing that is truly good: Nothing in the world—indeed nothing even beyond the world—can possibly be conceived which could be called good without qualification except a good will. Kant then argues that the consequences of an act of willing cannot be used to determine that the person has a good will; good consequences could arise by accident from an action that was motivated by a desire to cause harm to an innocent person, and bad consequences could arise from an action that was well-motivated. Instead, he claims, a person has a good will when he 'acts out of respect for the moral law'. People 'act out of respect for the moral law' when they act in some way because they have a duty to do so. So, the only thing that is truly good in itself is a good will, and a good will is only good when the willer chooses to do something because it is that person's duty, i.e. out of "respect" for the law. He defines respect as "the concept of a worth which thwarts my self-love."
Views: 13018 The Audiopedia
How Do Ethical Principles Develop?
 
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Dr. Richard M. Jacobs is professor of public administration at Villanova University.
Views: 82 Public Integrity
The 5 Ethical Principles of Journalism
 
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Views: 802 Mellisa Lim
What is NEGOTIATION ETHICS? What does NEGOTIATION ETHICS mean? NEGOTIATION ETHICS meaning
 
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What is NEGOTIATION ETHICS? What does NEGOTIATION ETHICS mean? NEGOTIATION ETHICS meaning - NEGOTIATION ETHICS definition - NEGOTIATION ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Negotiation ethics is a legal term meaning "refraining from making fraudulent misrepresentations." A 2004 article in the Marquette Law Review indicated that negotiating ethics had developed from an individual merely knowing the minimal legal threshold of acceptable behavior, to individuals being more aware that interests can be best understood in a wide perspective of ethical behavioral over the long term. This basis of negotiation introduces not only a moral argument, but also introduces a case for the utilitarianism movement. Respect lies deep within the foundation of this school of thought concerning ethical negotiation. The authors propose that the negotiator does the right thing, even interpreting more ambivalent ethical questions conservatively; not because of the attractiveness of potential short-or long-term payoffs, but simply because the other party deserves to be treated with respect and not instrumentalized as a means to one’s own better negotiation results. For many professional negotiators, the idea of being ethical during a negotiation is a dangerous minefield leading through an impossible feat, not meant to be accomplished. Many of these negotiators feel that negotiation ethics create a weak negotiation because it “encourages parties to disclose information to each other and develop a degree of trust, in contrast to the adversarial posture of traditional positional bargaining.” This expression of trust is contrary to the hard-tactic negotiations displayed by so many in the business world today. The thought of mutual benefit is dissipated, while the greed for gain over another grows rampantly. The moral minimum for negotiating ethics consists of interests of well-being, autonomy, political freedom, standard social roles, and focal interests. Although the aggression and competition of gamesmanship may lead to short-term gains, it has two major drawbacks in an interest-based environment. The first issue with gamesmanship is that reputation counts, so that any immediate benefit will be negated by the inefficiencies imposed by distrust and the opportunity costs of foregone future transactions. When one displays unethical behavior in negotiation settings, painful consequences may possibly arise. According to research, done by Ma and Parks, those who choose to engage in unethical negotiations increase the likelihood for reputational risk. Research has demonstrated that college students who described having an ethical role model were less likely to adopt questionable ethical behavior in negotiation situations. Bandura notes that "the standards acquired through modeling are affected by variations in the judgments displayed by the same model over time and by discrepancies between what models practice and what they preach.
Views: 636 The Audiopedia
Principles and Guidelines for Ethical Research and Evaluation in Development
 
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This short animation provides an outline of the Principles and Guidelines for Ethical Research and Evaluation in Development, co-published by the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) and the Research for Development Impact Network. This animation is intended as an introduction to further training on the application of these Principles and Guidelines . For more information, visit www.rdinetwork.org.au/resources/.
Views: 7395 ACFID
10. Morality, Values and Ethics | For ESE Paper 1
 
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For all reading material (only who have NOT done in past, this has to be done only once), click the below link : https://goo.gl/forms/F7NIP3KUCmR2i2yF2 Dear Friends, Here are the Morals, Values and Ethics explanation. This video explains: Introduction 1:40-3:19 Moral: Morality means principles, they are some kind of theories. These are the theoretical philosophies of society. These are the theories of society that tells whether something is good or bad. Socio-cultural aspects decide the morality. Social perceptions are called morality. 3:22- 8:20 Values: Values represent individual’s value system. Values mean what is good and what is bad from an individual’s perspective. Value system is affected from morality and ethics. Behaviors o an individual is mostly decided by the value system. 10:54-13:40 Individual Behavior 13:40-14:15 Ethics: It includes ethical code of conduct. These are the practical aspects of moral principles. It is in the written form. As member of organization you have to follow these instructions. 8:20-10:53 Summary 14:15-17:06 Diagrammatical Explanation of Ethics, values and Morals 17:27-22:39 Ethics & Values in Engineering Profession 22:44-34:11 For more details, videos & test series please visit us at: Website: www.yourpedia.in Email: [email protected] Like us at: https://www.facebook.com/Yourpedia/ Watch some more videos on ESE Prelim Paper 1 at: Engineering Aptitude Covering Logical reasoning: https://bit.ly/2BDvDJM Standards and Quality Practices : https://bit.ly/2ArNgdF Basics of Energy and Environment: https://bit.ly/2TSUdxe Basics of Project Management: https://bit.ly/2KDzlGg Information and Communication Technologies: https://bit.ly/2BCbHXz Ethics and Values in Engineering Profession: https://bit.ly/2Q0Sg3C Here is the asked video about ethics value and morality, please see other parts too, the links are given at the end section of this video. Wish you great learning Experience! Please do give feedback on the video in the comments section, Best of Luck! Team Yourpedia! www.yourpedia.in
Views: 5761 Yourpedia Education
Ethical Principles in Counselling
 
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The principles mention in professional code of ethics is specific and directs which make the work of a counsellor simple and easy. A professional counsellor who follows the principles can enhance his/her competence and can build a strong professional career.
Core Ethical Principles - Patient Autonomy, Beneficence, Nonmaleficence & Justice
 
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Views: 7047 USMLEFastTrack
Meaning of Ethics Lecture in Hindi - Ethics And Communication | IPCC
 
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intro music credit - http://www.bensound.com/
Views: 89518 CA Online Study
नैतिकता (Morality and Ethics): नैतिकता का परिचय
 
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इस वीडियो में डॉ मनीषिका जैन नैतिकता की अवधारणा और नैतिकता के आधार - VAME - मान, दृष्टिकोण, नैतिकता का आधार बताते हैं। इस सत्र में नैतिकता के अर्थ पर चर्चा की गई है और बताया गया है कि ये अलग कैसे हैं पूर्ण अध्ययन सामग्री यात्रा के लिए - https://www.doorsteptutor.com/Exams/IAS/Mains/
Views: 99389 Examrace Hindi
HR Basics: Human Reosurce Ethics 2e
 
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HR Basics is a series of short courses, designed to highlight what you need to know about a particular human resource management topic. In today’s HR Basics, we explore the three principles of human resource ethics – upholding the law, professional behavior and justice. Commonly, ethics is defined as principles that govern a person’s behavior. I believe that the path to sound organizational ethics begins with the professionals who lead in the Human Resource of that organization. That means that Human Resource professionals bear the responsibility of building and maintaining the foundation of ethics in their organization. The worlds largest, and most predominant HR professional association, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), Code of Ethics states: As HR professionals, we are responsible for adding value to the organizations we serve and contributing to the ethical success of those organizations. From my perspective, there are three principles that frame Human Resource Ethics: Protecting Rights, we consider the rights of individuals and our organization, promote truth, and build trust. Professional Behavior, meaning we commit to individual leadership and the highest standards in our conduct. Promote Justice, meaning we are responsible for fostering fairness for all employees in our organization. Protecting employee rights means that human resource professionals consider the rights of individuals and their organization, promote truth, and build trust. Professional behavior refers to the commitment of human resource professionals to individual leadership and the highest standards in our conduct. Promoting justice means that human resource professionals are responsible for encouraging and fostering fairness for all employees in our organization. Human resource ethics supports organizational values and compliance.
Views: 1726 Gregg Learning
ETHICS || CS Professional || Principles in Business Lec 1 Video 1
 
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ETHICS PRINCIPLES IN BUSINESS LEC 1 Video 1 (1) Ethical Principles in business (a) Meaning of Organisation (b) Ethics in Organisation (c) Top level Responsibility of Ethics Climate (d) Relationship between organisation and Ethics 1) CS Professional Video Lectures 2) Ethics Governance & Sustainability Video Lectures 3) Principles in Business Video Lectures 4) Ethics of CS Professional 5) Examples of business operating principles 6) Business principles and practices 7) Business concepts and principles 8) Basic principles of running a business 9) 7 business principles in Business 10) Old/New Course We provide these classes in an online and offline mode like Pendrive, Download Link, SD Card. VIDEO LECTURES with BOOKS APPLE JUICE NOTES & FLOW CHARTS STUDY – Whereever, Whenever SAVE – Time, Money STUDY @ HOME To know more about my Video Lectures & Books – CALL – 011-45038585 / 09873149995 or [email protected]l.com or VISIT & SUBSCRIBE MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL :- https://www.youtube.com/user/bhupeshanand FOLLOW US ON :- #FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/bhupesh.anand #INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/bhupeshananadclasses/ #TWITTER: https://twitter.com/bhupeshanandcla #LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ca-bhupesh-anand-classes-698315168/ #TELEGRAM GROUPS: - CS Group - https://bit.ly/2Gdzz8t CFA® Level 1 Group – https://bit.ly/2QrS11I CA Group – https://bit.ly/2Bi0DOd CMA Group - https://bit.ly/2ULgPjE #AMAZON - https://amzn.to/2LhWTRk #FLIPKART - https://bit.ly/2ryL4No
Medical Ethics
 
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A presentation on ‘Medical Ethics’ that systematically goes through the following: • Definition • Historical Background • The 4 Basic Principles (‘Pillars’) of Medical Ethics • Contemporary issues in Medical Ethics • Landmark Judgements • Examples of Medical Ethical dilemmas • The Attributes of an Ethical Doctor The presentation finishes with a set of 5 self-assessment MCQs. This video has been prepared by: Dr. S. Rajagopal MBBS, DPM (Ireland), MRCPsych (UK), CCST (UK) Consultant Psychiatrist Chennai, Tamil Nadu, INDIA DISCLAIMER This video is provided for educational / informational purposes only. This is not a substitute for professional medical consultation. Medical Ethics is a constantly evolving field. I cannot give any guarantee that the information in this video is accurate or up to date. I assume no responsibility for any omissions or errors.
Views: 11931 Psychiatry Lectures
What is NORMATIVE ETHICS? What does NORMATIVE ETHICS mean? NORMATIVE ETHICS meaning & explanation
 
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What is NORMATIVE ETHICS? What does NORMATIVE ETHICS mean? NORMATIVE ETHICS meaning - NORMATIVE ETHICS definition - NORMATIVE ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Normative ethics is the study of ethical action. It is the branch of philosophical ethics that investigates the set of questions that arise when considering how one ought to act, morally speaking. Normative ethics is distinct from meta-ethics because it examines standards for the rightness and wrongness of actions, while meta-ethics studies the meaning of moral language and the metaphysics of moral facts. Normative ethics is also distinct from descriptive ethics, as the latter is an empirical investigation of people’s moral beliefs. To put it another way, descriptive ethics would be concerned with determining what proportion of people believe that killing is always wrong, while normative ethics is concerned with whether it is correct to hold such a belief. Hence, normative ethics is sometimes called prescriptive, rather than descriptive. However, on certain versions of the meta-ethical view called moral realism, moral facts are both descriptive and prescriptive at the same time. Most traditional moral theories rest on principles that determine whether an action is right or wrong. Classical theories in this vein include utilitarianism, Kantianism, and some forms of contractarianism. These theories mainly offered the use of overarching moral principles to resolve difficult moral decisions. There are disagreements about what precisely gives an action, rule, or disposition its ethical force. There are three competing views on how moral questions should be answered, along with hybrid positions that combine some elements of each. Virtue ethics focuses on the character of those who are acting, while both deontological ethics and consequentialism focus on the status of the action, rule, or disposition itself. The latter two conceptions of ethics themselves come in various forms. Virtue ethics, advocated by Aristotle with some aspects being supported by St Thomas Aquinas, focuses on the inherent character of a person rather than on specific actions. There has been a significant revival of virtue ethics in the past half-century, through the work of such philosophers as G. E. M. Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Alasdair Macintyre, Mortimer J. Adler, Jacques Maritain, Yves Simon, and Rosalind Hursthouse. Deontology argues that decisions should be made considering the factors of one's duties and one's rights. Some deontological theories include: Immanuel Kant's Categorical Imperative, which roots morality in humanity's rational capacity and asserts certain inviolable moral laws. The contractualism of John Rawls, which holds that the moral acts are those that we would all agree to if we were unbiased. Natural rights theories, such that of John Locke or Robert Nozick, which hold that human beings have absolute, natural rights. Consequentialism (Teleology) argues that the morality of an action is contingent on the action's outcome or result. Consequentialist theories, differing in what they consider valuable (Axiology), include: Utilitarianism, which holds that an action is right if it leads to the most happiness for the greatest number of people. (Historical Note: Prior to the coining of the term "consequentialism" by Anscombe in 1958 and the adoption of that term in the literature that followed, "utilitarianism" was the generic term for consequentialism, referring to all theories that promoted maximizing any form of utility, not just those that promoted maximizing happiness.) State consequentialism or Mohist consequentialism, which holds that an action is right if it leads to state welfare, through order, material wealth, and population growth Egoism, the belief that the moral person is the self-interested person, holds that an action is right if it maximizes good for the self. Situation Ethics, which holds that the correct action is the one that creates the most loving result, and that love should always be our goal. Intellectualism, which dictates that the best action is the one that best fosters and promotes knowledge.....
Views: 7508 The Audiopedia
Aristotle & Virtue Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #38
 
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This week we explore final ethical theory in this unit: Aristotle’s virtue theory. Hank explains the Golden Mean, and how it exists as the midpoint between vices of excess and deficiency. We’ll also discuss moral exemplars, and introduce the concept of “eudaimonia.” Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1146006 CrashCourse
What is Virtue Ethics? (Philosophical Definition)
 
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A quick explanation of Virtue, Virtue Ethics, and how it differs from Deontology and Consequentialism. Sponsors: João Costa Neto, Dakota Jones, Joe Felix, Prince Otchere, Mike Samuel, Daniel Helland, Mohammad Azmi Banibaker, Dennis Sexton, Yu Saburi, Mauricino Andrade, Will Roberts, Greg Gauthier, Christian Bay, Joao Sa, and √2. Thanks for your support! Donate on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Carneades Buy stuff with Zazzle: http://www.zazzle.com/carneades Follow us on Twitter: @CarneadesCyrene https://twitter.com/CarneadesCyrene Information for this video gathered from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and more!
Views: 28493 Carneades.org
What is GOVERNMENT ETHICS? What does GOVERNMENT ETHICS mean? GOVERNMENT ETHICS meaning
 
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What is GOVERNMENT ETHICS? What does GOVERNMENT ETHICS mean? GOVERNMENT ETHICS meaning - GOVERNMENT ETHICS definition - GOVERNMENT ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Government ethics constitutes the application of ethical rules to government. It is that part of practical jurisprudence, or the philosophy of law, that governs the operation of government and its relationship with the people that it governs. It covers issues of honesty and transparency in government, dealing with matters such as bribery, political corruption, police corruption, legislative ethics, regulatory ethics, conflict of interest, avoiding the appearance of impropriety, open government, and legal ethics. The US office of government ethics was initiated by the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 to provide overall leadership and policy direction for an ethics program in the Executive branch of government. This same picture is mirrored, albeit in a patchy way, across US state administrations. Altogether the US model of Public sector ethics has become highly regulated and, some would say, cumbersome. Government officials serve the people, managing the resources of others. Along with this stewardship, there is an expectation from the public that in conducting daily activities, the officials will practice fairness and equality. They are also expected to maintain openness in their workings to ensure that they are operating within the public's perception of what is "right." This concept of ethics, a branch of philosophy which seeks to address morality, is not a relatively new idea within government. Niccolo Machiavelli wrote The Prince, which serves as a manual to illustrate what a monarchy should do to maintain power. This treatise is often viewed as a tool of how a public official should not act in modern society, as it is an enumeration of the specific steps one should take to maintain control and power. This idea of control and power conflicts with the underlying principle of being a steward to the general public. As such, this treatise is a springboard for ethical issues in modern-day times. Paul Douglas, a former United States Senator from Illinois, argues that while many may secretly follow Machiavelli in their heart, most do not. “Instead, most men want a life of integrity and goodwill in which public officials are stewards rather than masters and treat their jobs as a means of helping people rather than dominating them” . Douglas further argues why ethical practices are needed. “Our government is now so huge and affects our lives so directly that we cannot be content with merely a moderately decent level of behavior on the part of our public officials. For even a small percentage of misbehavior on the part of these officials can do a vast amount of harm” . Regulatory ethics is a body of law and practical political philosophy that governs the conduct of civil servants and the members of regulatory agencies. It addresses issues such as bribery and the relationship of civil servants with the businesses in the industries they regulate, as well as concerns about transparency, freedom of information and sunshine laws, and conflict of interest rules. While Machiavelli and Douglas are distant in time, the two opposing viewpoints of the types of public administrators, and the ethical stance of the decisions they make, are very relevant today. Further illustrating the bifurcation of thought on ethics in government, Cody and Lynn discuss the two opposing factors: utilitarian's and deontologists. Utilitarians: Believe that the end sought justifies the means to that end. In other words, if an ethical solution is more costly, a utilitarian will argue from a standpoint of efficiency or effectiveness to justify a less ethical solution. Deontologists: Believe that certain absolute principles should be obeyed, regardless of the consequences. An example of an absolute principle would be honesty. The definition of these two behavioral models is not necessarily exclusive. It is possible for a person to make a decision based upon a utilitarian stance and then follow a deontological stance for a separate decision. This is because the concept of ethics is vague and ultimately is based upon principles and values, which will differ among situations and people.
Views: 3539 The Audiopedia
Ethics & Legal for USMLE Step 1
 
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http://www.stomponstep1.com/ethical-principles-confidentiality-capacity-medical-ethics-beneficence-bioethics-law/ Ethical Principles • Autonomy = respect patient's decisions about their own health • Non-maleficence = do no harm. Can still take calculated risk if potential benefits outweigh the potential risks • Beneficence = promote patients best interests • Justice = distribute medical benefits fairly and do not discriminate against any particular group Capacity/Competence Capacity is a person's mental ability to make informed decisions about their own health. A capacitated individual has to be able to understand the medical information given to them, retain that information, use the information given to them to make an informed decision and communicate that decision to their providers. The decision they make must be in line with their previous beliefs and not be the result of psychiatric symptoms (hallucinations of delusions). Certain psychiatric disorders, neurologic diseases, lack of consciousness, developmental disorders, age, severe pain, drugs or alcohol can all temporarily or permanently prevent someone from being capacitated. A couple clinical indicators or concern by a family member is not enough to deem a patient incompetent. A thorough examination of the patient must be performed before a patient is deemed incompetent. Patients are assumed to be competent until there is substantial proof showing otherwise. An individual who lacks capacity cannot give informed consent. Capacity is similar to the legal term Competence. When a lack of capacity is involved, the requirement for informed consent is not removed. In these situations the responsibility of informed consent is transferred to a family member, friend or social worker. The physician should not be making these decisions for patient. Deciding which person will speak for the incapacitated patient follows a set of criteria. The first option is the patient speaking for themselves through an advanced directive or will. In this case the patient decides ahead of time what types of treatment they will want in certain scenarios. However, there are an infinite number of different scenarios that cannot all be outlined by the patient so a person is also needed to speak for the patient. The first person chosen to fill this role should be an individual identified by the patient (before they became incapacitated) through medical power of attorney. This person (called a proxy or surrogate) is identified by the patient ahead of time. If no such person has been identified by the patient a family member such as a spouse receives the responsibility. Whoever ends up being selected to speak for the patient should not be choosing what they want for the patient. They should be trying to relay what they think the patient would want if they could speak for themselves. Minors and Capacity Minors (patients under the age of 18) are considered to not have the capacity to make medical decisions. This means that the patient's parents give consent for medical treatment instead of the patient and that certain rules of confidentiality don't apply to the parents. Emancipation is the process in which a minor obtains the right to make their own medical decisions. For medical purposes a minor is emancipated if they file to become officially emancipated, live on their own, are married, have children of their own or are pregnant. In these cases a minor is treated as if they were an adult. There are exceptions to the rule where minors have the right to confidentiality and do not need consent from a parent. The way I remember these exceptions is the phrase "sex, drugs and rock n' roll." Sex stands for contraception, treatment of STDs, treatment of pregnancy or just the fact that they are having sex which might be found during the history. Drugs stand for knowledge of alcohol or drug related activities as well as medical situations that may arise as a result of these substances. Rock N' Roll stands for emergency situation in which a parent may not be able to be contacted in time to provide care. Abortion is a situation where informed consent and confidentiality for minors is handled a bit differently. Some states require parent's permission for an abortion (informed consent must be obtained from the parent) and other states only require parental notification (confidentiality is broken and parents are notified but they do not need to consent).
Views: 59637 Stomp On Step 1
Utilitarianism: Crash Course Philosophy #36
 
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Our next stop in our tour of the ethical lay of the land is utilitarianism. With a little help from Batman, Hank explains the principle of utility, and the difference between act and rule utilitarianism. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1786411 CrashCourse
Ethical principles of nursing
 
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Very importent principles guyz keep in youtmr mind . Subscribe shre like the channel and video for more updates tq....
Views: 303 ONLY FOR NURSES
The four ethical principles: should we prioritise autonomy?
 
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Discover the four ethical principles and how they affect the professional decisions in the day to day care of patients with dementia. Explore dementia with our free online course. Find out more at http://www.derby.ac.uk/online/mooc/bridging-dementia-divide Learn about dementia: dementia definition, dementia stages, dementia types and much more in our free dementia course online. Enrolment is now open, registration closes on 17th of April 2016, hurry spaces are limited.
Leadership Ethics
 
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Before we get started, lets agree on a common definition of ethics. Ethics are the principles that govern a person's behavior. More specifically for our conversation, the principles that govern a leaders behavior. CHECK OUT THESE GREGG LEARNING VIDEOS: How Do I Build a Leadership Brand? | https://youtu.be/fdne4MiNQHE
Views: 7941 Gregg Learning
Ethics Principles
 
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11/18/13-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 15625 SchoolisHard
What is WORK ETHIC? What does WORK ETHIC mean? WORK ETHIC meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is WORK ETHIC? What does WORK ETHIC mean? WORK ETHIC meaning - WORK ETHIC definition - WORK ETHIC explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Work ethic is a belief that work, hard work and diligence has a moral benefit and an inherent ability, virtue or value to strengthen character. It is about prioritizing work and putting it in the center of life. Social ingrainment of this value is considered to enhance character through hard work that is respective to an individuals field of work. A strong work ethic is vital for achieving goals. A work ethic is a set of moral principles a person uses in their job. People who possess a strong work ethic embody certain principles that guide their work behavior, leading them to produce high-quality work consistently and the output feeds the individual to stay on track. A good work ethic fuels an individuals needs and goals, it is related to the initiative by a person for the objectives. It is considered as a source of self respect, satisfaction, and fulfillment. Factors are: Goal-oriented actions: it is not about making plans or the next logical steps; it's about getting things done so that the work invested wouldn't be counter-productive. Dedicate on priority: focusing on qualitative activities that a person is capable and where they can make a difference or a high impact based on objectives. Being available and reliable: spending time on the work and building oneself up for the task. Conscientiousness: a desire to do a task well, being vigilant and organized. Creating a rewarding routine/system: Engaging in tasks that provide strength and energy which can be transferred to your ultimate goals, creating a habit and a habitat for success. Embracing positivism: shape a problem with the statement "good, (action) (problem)", e.g. "I'm tired and it is time for a workout" leads to "Good. Workout tired". A negative work ethic is a behavior of a single individual or a group that has led to a systematic lack of productivity, reliability, accountability and a growing sphere of unprofessional/unhealthy relationships (e.g., power politics, lack of social skills, etc.). Capitalist view: Steven Malanga refers to "what was once understood as the work ethic—not just hard work but also a set of accompanying virtues, whose crucial role in the development and sustaining of free markets too few now recall". Max Weber quotes the ethical writings of Benjamin Franklin: Remember, that time is money. He that can earn ten shillings a day by his labor, and goes abroad, or sits idle, one half of that day, though he spends but sixpence during his diversion or idleness, ought not to reckon that the only expense; he has really spent, or rather thrown away, five shillings besides. Remember, that money is the prolific, generating nature. Money can beget money, and its offspring can beget more, and so on. Five shillings turned is six, turned again is seven and threepence, and so on, till it becomes a hundred pounds. The more there is of it, the more it produces every turning, so that the profits rise quicker and quicker. He that kills a breeding sow, destroys all her offspring to the thousandth generation. He that murders a crown, destroys all that it might have produced, even scores of pounds. Weber notes that this is not a philosophy of mere greed, but a statement laden with moral language. It is in effect an ethical response to the natural desire for hedonic reward, a statement of the value of delayed gratification to achieve self-actualization. Franklin claims that Bible readings revealed to him the usefulness of virtue. Indeed, this reflects the then christian search for ethic for living and the struggle to make a living. ,,,,
Views: 3391 The Audiopedia
Code of Ethics Fundamental Principles - Objectivity
 
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Code of Ethics Fundamental Principles - Objectivity The second fundamental principle is objectivity. Objectivity refers to being impartial and unbiased. It requires the avoidance of situations and circumstances that would result in personal feelings and opinions affecting decisions and actions. In other words, the avoidance conflicts of interest.
What is SITUATIONAL ETHICS? What does SITUATIONAL ETHICS mean? SITUATIONAL ETHICS meaning
 
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What is SITUATIONAL ETHICS? What does SITUATIONAL ETHICS mean? SITUATIONAL ETHICS meaning - SITUATIONAL ETHICS definition - SITUATIONAL ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Situational ethics, or situation ethics, takes into account the particular context of an act when evaluating it ethically, rather than judging it according to absolute moral standards. In situation ethics, within each context, it is not a universal law that is to be followed, but the law of love. A Greek word used to describe love in the Bible is "agape". Agape is the type of love that shows concern about others, caring for them as much as one cares for oneself. Agape love is conceived as having no strings attached to it and seeking nothing in return; it is a totally unconditional love. Early proponents of situational approaches to ethics included Kierkegaard, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Jaspers, and Heidegger. Specifically Christian forms of situational ethics placing love above all particular principles or rules were proposed in the first half of the twentieth century by Rudolf Bultmann, John A. T. Robinson, and Joseph Fletcher. These theologians point specifically to agape, or unconditional love, as the highest end. Other theologians who advocated situational ethics include Josef Fuchs, Reinhold Niebuhr, Karl Barth, Emil Brunner, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Paul Tillich. Tillich, for example, declared that "Love is the ultimate law." Fletcher, who became prominently associated with this approach in the English-speaking world due to his book (Situation Ethics), stated that "all laws and rules and principles and ideals and norms, are only contingent, only valid if they happen to serve love" in the particular situation,:30 and thus may be broken or ignored if another course of action would achieve a more loving outcome. Fletcher has sometimes been identified as the founder of situation ethics, but he himself refers his readers to the active debate over the theme that preceded his own work. Situational ethics is a form of consequentialism, though distinct from utilitarianism in that the latter's aim is "the greatest good for the greatest number", while situational ethics focuses on creating the greatest amount of love. Situational ethics can also be classed under the ethical theory genre of "proportionalism" which says that "It is never right to go against a principle unless there is a proportionate reason which would justify it." J. A. T. Robinson, a situational ethicist, considered the approach to be a form of ethical relativism. There was an active debate in the mid-twentieth century around situational ethics, which was being promoted by a number of primarily Protestant theologians. The English term "situation ethics" was taken from the German Situationsethik. It is unclear who first coined the term either in German or in its English variant.
Views: 6223 The Audiopedia
Understanding Ethics in Management
 
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In this course, we will define ethics in management and explain how ethical behavior plays an important role in the life of manager’s today. Ethics is the code of moral principles and values that governs the behaviors of a person or group with respect to what is right or wrong. Ethics sets standards as to what is good or bad in conduct and decision making. An ethical issue is present in a situation when the actions of a person or organization may harm or benefit others.
Views: 5277 Gregg Learning
The Significance of Ethics and Ethics Education in Daily Life | Michael D. Burroughs | TEDxPSU
 
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Although we might not realize it, we all face ethical issues on a regular basis. But how do we know how to respond well to these issues, to make better (as opposed to worse) ethical decisions? In this TEDx talk Dr. Michael D. Burroughs discusses the numerous kinds of ethical issues we face, possibilities for increasing our ethical awareness as "everyday ethicists," and the importance of introducing ethics and philosophical education in our schools. Dr. Burroughs also discusses the role of ethics in the lives of children and ways in which adults can attempt to understand and learn from children in ethical discussions. Michael D. Burroughs is a philosopher, ethicist, educator (and beekeeper). Michael earned his PhD. in Philosophy from the University of Memphis and currently serves as Associate Director of the Rock Ethics Institute and Senior Lecturer of Philosophy at Penn State. Michael has published widely on topics in ethics, the philosophy of education, and childhood. In addition, he has devoted much of his professional career to practicing philosophy and ethics with populations beyond the university, including children in K-12 schools, prison inmates, and senior citizens. Michael's forthcoming book (co-authored with Jana Mohr Lone) is entitled Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialogue in Schools (Rowman and Littlefield, 2016) and addresses the purpose, theory, and practice of teaching philosophy and ethics in K-12 schools. In addition to his professional pursuits, Michael enjoys spending time in the out-of-doors, playing music, and traveling, among other things. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 118158 TEDx Talks
Forensic Science  History, principles, Division and  Ethics in Forensic Science
 
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Subject:Criminology Paper: Forensic Science and Forensic Medicine
Views: 8016 Vidya-mitra
Basic Principles in Medical Ethics - CRASH! Medical Review Series
 
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For just $1/month, you can help keep these videos free! Subscribe to my Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/pwbmd (Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnosis of any illness. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should consult your physician or seek immediate medical attention.)
Views: 8294 Paul Bolin, M.D.
What is CODE OF CONDUCT? What does CODE OF CONDUCT mean? CODE OF CONDUCT meaning & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ STUDENT PAPER ASSIGNMENTS DONE BY ACADEMY WRITERS. We write your papers - you get TOP GRADES! Check us out and ORDER your plagiarism-free papers with free revisions and money back guarantee - https://extraessay.com?key_wpg=c8ce723fad1d07be0b01e85b83860629 ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is CODE OF CONDUCT? What does CODE OF CONDUCT mean? CODE OF CONDUCT meaning - CODE OF CONDUCT definition - CODE OF CONDUCT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A 'code of conduct' is a set of rules outlining the social norms and rules and responsibilities of, or proper practices for, an individual, party or organization. Related concepts include ethical, honor, moral codes and religious laws. In its 2007 International Good Practice Guidance, "Defining and Developing an Effective Code of Conduct for Organizations", the International Federation of Accountants provided the following working definition: "Principles, values, standards, or rules of behaviour that guide the decisions, procedures and systems of an organization in a way that (a) contributes to the welfare of its key stakeholders, and (b) respects the rights of all constituents affected by its operations." A common code of conduct is written for employees of a company, which protects the business and informs the employees of the company's expectations. It is ideal for even the smallest of companies to form a document containing important information on expectations for employees. The document does not need to be complex or have elaborate policies, but the file needs a simple basis of what the company expects from each employee. A Code of Conduct can be an important step in establishing an inclusive culture, but it is not a comprehensive solution on its own. An ethical culture is created by the organization's leaders who manifest their ethics in their attitudes and behavior. Studies of codes of conduct in the private sector show that their effective implementation must be part of a learning process that requires training, consistent enforcement, and continuous measurement/improvement. Simply requiring members to read the code is not enough to ensure that they understand it and will remember its contents. The proof of CoC effectiveness is when employees/members feel comfortable enough to voice concerns and believe that the organization will respond with appropriate action.
Views: 43753 The Audiopedia
Ethical Principles
 
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Views: 1459 Christopher Molnar
What is ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP? What does ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP mean? ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP meaning
 
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What is ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP? What does ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP mean? ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP meaning - ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP definition - ETHICAL RELATIONSHIP explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. An ethical relationship, in most theories of ethics that employ the term, is a basic and trustworthy relationship that one has to another human being, that cannot necessarily be characterized in terms of any abstraction other than trust and common protection of each other's body. Honesty is very often a major focus. Usually the most basic of these relationships studied is that between the mother and child, and second most basic is between sexual partners—the focus of feminism and Queer theory respectively, where relationships are central. Family role theory extends this to study paternalistic, maternalistic and sibling roles, and postulates that one's later relationships are formed largely in order to fill the roles one has grown to find comfortable as part of one's family environment—the family of origin thus setting pattern for the family of choice. Another type of ethical relationship is that between the student at an institution and his or her instructor. Because teaching is “leadership based upon moral and ethical principles.” The student is positioned into a role where participation means understanding and resolving multiple issues of ethics, including the actions of his or her professor or instructor. As contrasted to theories of ethics that derive from dispute resolution, or the meta-ethics as defined in Western moral philosophy, ethical traditions emphasizing abstract moral codes expressed in some language with some judgmental hierarchy, ethical relationship theories tend to emphasize human development. Thus they focus on unequal power and such matters as sexual honesty, marital commitment, child-raising, and responsibility to conduct such essential body and care matters as toilet training, weaning, forming attitudes to sexuality and to masturbation. Failures to consider consequences of teachings or examples set in these matters is disastrous, as it leads to failures of the most fundamental relationship any person has: to their own body, shame in it, pride in it, care for it, etc. Care and concern for other's bodies follows. No ethical tradition has failed to prescribe at least some rules for the conduct of such relationships. Carol Gilligan famously championed the role of relationships as central to moral reasoning, and superior as a basis for understanding human choices than any prior linguistic or meta-ethical concept. This perspective is now commonly called the ethics of care. Lawrence Kohlberg, famous for work on moral development as a part of human development, eventually joined Gilligan in starting a descriptive ethics of relationship conduct in what they called the ethical community or just community. This was in effect a community of practice which, at least in Kohlberg's conception, had a core epistemic community of those trusted to define and resolve the disputes between members, and to facilitate the growth of moral development, not only in children, but in prisoners and others. Donald R. C. Reed, whose book Following Kohlberg: Liberalism and the Practice of Democratic Community (1998) outlined the extension of these principles to deliberative democracy, claims that "During the four years following publication of Gilligan's In a Different Voice (1982), Kohlberg and Gilligan both revised their accounts of moral development so that they converged far more than is commonly recognized." Reed argued for "extending this convergence to include the understanding developed in the just community projects." There is also potential for application of these methods to ethical tradition. Kohlberg's student Burton Visotzky, for instance, in The Genesis of Ethics, 1997, applied the relationship approach to Ethics in the Bible. The book focuses on the choices and interactions of major characters in the Book of Genesis. Visotzky exploits much of the Talmudic, midrash and magisterium, demonstrating that these Jewish theological traditions too had often focused on the ethical relationship, not only between Man and God, but between others in one's family, tribe or community. Mohandas Gandhi, Confucius, Menno Simons and Baruch Spinoza are examples of figures in moral philosophy and political philosophy who focused first and foremost on the ethical choices made in the actual framing and encounter of moral interventions. Greens and New Confucians are two examples of modern movements that are derived in part from relational traditions.
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What is ETHICAL DILEMMA? What does ETHICAL DILEMMA mean? ETHICAL DILEMMA meaning & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ STUDENT PAPER ASSIGNMENTS DONE BY ACADEMY WRITERS. We write your papers - you get TOP GRADES! Check us out and ORDER your plagiarism-free papers with free revisions and money back guarantee - https://extraessay.com?key_wpg=c8ce723fad1d07be0b01e85b83860629 ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is ETHICAL DILEMMA? What does ETHICAL DILEMMA mean? ETHICAL DILEMMA meaning - ETHICAL DILEMMA definition - ETHICAL DILEMMA explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. An ethical dilemma is a complex situation that often involves an apparent mental conflict between moral imperatives, in which to obey one would result in transgressing another. Sometimes called ethical paradoxes in moral philosophy, ethical dilemmas are often invoked in an attempt to refute an ethical system or moral code, or to improve it so as to resolve the paradox. These arguments can be refuted in various ways, for example by showing that the claimed ethical dilemma is only apparent and does not really exist (thus is not a paradox logically), or that the solution to the ethical dilemma involves choosing the greater good and lesser evil (as discussed in value theory), or that the whole framing of the problem omits creative alternatives (such as peacemaking), or (more recently) that situational ethics or situated ethics must apply because the case cannot be removed from context and still be understood. See also case-based reasoning on this process. An alternative to situational ethics is graded absolutism. Perhaps the most commonly cited ethical conflict is that between an imperative or injunction not to steal and one to care for a family that you cannot afford to feed without stolen money. Debates on this often revolve around the availability of alternate means of income or support such as a social safety net, charity, etc. The debate is in its starkest form when framed as stealing food. Under an ethical system in which stealing is always wrong and letting one's family die from starvation is always wrong, a person in such a situation would be forced to commit one wrong to avoid committing another, and be in constant conflict with those whose view of the acts varied. However, there are no legitimate ethical systems in which stealing is more wrong than letting one's family die. Ethical systems do in fact allow for, and sometimes outline, tradeoffs or priorities in decisions. Some have suggested that international law requires this kind of mechanism to resolve whether World Trade Organization (WTO) or Kyoto Protocol takes precedence in deciding whether a WTO notification is valid. That is, whether nations may use trade mechanisms to complain about climate change measures. As there are few economies that can operate smoothly in a chaotic climate, the dilemma would seem to be easy to resolve, but since fallacious justifications for restricting trade are easily imagined, just as fallacious justifications for theft are easily imagined at the family level, the seemingly obvious resolution becomes clouded by the suspicion of an illegitimate motive. Resolving ethical dilemmas is rarely simple or clearcut and very often involves revisiting similar dilemmas that recur within societies: According to some philosophers and sociologists, e.g. Karl Marx, it is the different life experience of people and the different exposure of them and their families in these roles (the rich constantly robbing the poor, the poor in a position of constant begging and subordination) that creates social class differences. In other words, ethical dilemmas can become political and economic factions that engage in long term recurring struggles. See conflict theory and left-wing politics versus right-wing politics. Design of a voting system, other electoral reform, a criminal justice system, or other high-stakes adversarial process for dispute resolution will almost always reflect the deep persistent struggles involved. However, no amount of good intent and hard work can undo a bad role structure: Where a structural conflict is involved, dilemmas will very often recur. A trivial example is working with a bad operating system whose error messages do not match the problems the user perceives. Each such error presents the user with a dilemma: reboot the machine and continue working at one's employment or spend time trying to reproduce the problem for the benefit of the developer of the operating system. So role structure sabotages feedback and results in sub-optimal results since provision has been made to actually reward people for reporting these errors and problems.
Views: 45553 The Audiopedia

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