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How to Write a Science, Journal Style Introduction Close Captioning
 
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This is a very informative short video by science writing specialists of Bates College, Seri Lowell on how to write an introduction to a research paper in a science journal. It has a lot of useful tips and is discussed in great detail. For simple steps on manuscript submission in any of the online/print subscription based Bentham Science journals, kindly visit http://benthamscience.com/
Views: 1311 Bentham Science
Socialist realism
 
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Socialist realism is a style of realistic art that was developed in the Soviet Union and became a dominant style in various other socialist countries. Socialist realism is characterized by the glorified depiction of communist values, such as the emancipation of the proletariat, in a realistic manner. Although related, it should not be confused with social realism, a broader type of art that realistically depicts subjects of social concern. Socialist realism was the predominant form of art in the Soviet Union from its development in the early 1920s to its eventual fall from popularity in the late 1960s. While other countries have employed a prescribed canon of art, socialist realism in Russia persisted longer and was more restricted than elsewhere in Europe. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 528 Audiopedia
Died at 81 Belarusian writer and film director Solomon Efimovich Shulman
 
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Solomon Efimovich Shulman was born on January 20, 1936 and died on September 6, 2017. He was also known as Sol Shulman and Semion Shulman. He was an author, screenwriter, film director and adventurer.Shulman's first profession was engineering. In 1966 he completed his second higher education degree at the Academy of Cinema in Moscow (VGIK), training as a film director. From 1963 to 1973 he worked as one of the creators of a popular documentary series called Film-Adventurer's Almanac (USSR) (artistic director Vladimir A. Shnejderov). He is the writer of more than forty documentary films, five feature film scripts, plus a host of literary and publicistic works, published in many countries worldwide. He has led film expeditions into the most distant corners of the planet—from the North Pole, to the summits of Pamir, the jungles of Africa, the islands of Oceania, and the deserts of Australia. He has worked at film studios in the USSR, Yugoslavia, Germany, USA, Italy and Australia, and has been awarded the Order of Soviet Journalists of the USSR. He is a presidium member of the Eurasian Academy of Television and Radio, a member of the Russian Cinematographers Union and Russian Film Directors Guild, a member of the Russian Writers' Union, a member of the Australian Writers' Guild, and a Professor at the Italian State University. His public appearances always attract a large student crowd in the auditoriums . http://deadobituary.com/
Views: 23 Dead Obituary
Denglisch | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Denglisch Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Denglisch (German spelling) or Denglish (English spelling) is a portmanteau of the German words Deutsch and Englisch (English), and can also be used to refer to a portmanteau of English and Dutch. The term is used in all German-speaking countries to refer to the increasingly strong influx of macaronic English or pseudo-English vocabulary (and other features of the language such as grammar and orthography) into German. Many synonyms exist, including Germ(l)ish, Gerglish, Angleutsch, Genglish, and Engleutsch as well as Pseudo-Englisch. Both these and Denglish are also used to refer to incorrect English that is influenced by German.To some extent, the influence of English on German can be described in terms of normal language contact (which is active also in the reverse direction, see list of English words of German origin). The term Denglisch is however mostly reserved for forced, excessive exercises in anglicization, or pseudo-anglicization, of the German language. The forced introduction of anglicisms, especially in marketing and business terminology, experienced a peak during the 1990s and the early 2000s, but the ubiquity of the practice has since made it much less fashionable or prestigious and since then, many publicistic commentators have argued against it.Zeit Online (itself an example of the prevalence of English loans in IT terminology) in a 2007 article, while granting the possibility of excessive linguistic purism among those arguing against anglicizing influence on German, criticises ubiquitous use of English (citing as example the fashion to label information desks at train stations, formerly simply known as Auskunft, with the anglicistic Service Point), and as an extreme case cites the pseudo-anglicistic Brain up! chosen by then-minister for education Edelgard Bulmahn as a campaign slogan in 2004. The same slogan had already been satirized by Frankfurter Allgemeine in 2004. That newspaper described how even the English-speaking sphere was mocking the unreflected and basically unnecessary kowtow as "German linguistic submissiveness".
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Socialist realism | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Socialist realism Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Socialist realism is a style of idealized realistic art that was developed in the Soviet Union and was imposed as the official style in that country between 1932 and 1988, as well as in other socialist countries after World War II. Socialist realism is characterized by the glorified depiction of communist values, such as the emancipation of the proletariat, by means of realistic imagery. Although related, it should not be confused with social realism, a type of art that realistically depicts subjects of social concern.Socialist realism was the predominant form of approved art in the Soviet Union from its development in the early 1920s to its eventual fall from official status beginning in the late 1960s until the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991. While other countries have employed a prescribed canon of art, socialist realism in the Soviet Union persisted longer and was more restrictive than elsewhere in Europe.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Cinema of the Soviet Union | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Cinema of the Soviet Union Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The cinema of the Soviet Union, not to be confused with "cinema of Russia" despite films in the Russian language being predominant in the body of work so described, includes films produced by the constituent republics of the Soviet Union reflecting elements of their pre-Soviet culture, language and history, albeit they were all regulated by the central government in Moscow. Most prolific in their republican films, after the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, were Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ukraine, and, to a lesser degree, Lithuania, Belarus and Moldavia. At the same time, the nation's film industry, which was fully nationalized throughout most of the country's history, was guided by philosophies and laws propounded by the monopoly Soviet Communist Party which introduced a new view on the cinema, socialist realism, which was different from the one before or after the existence of the Soviet Union.
Views: 19 wikipedia tts