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Literary Styles in the Bible
 
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Episode 3 shows how reading the Bible wisely requires that we learn about the ancient literary styles used by the biblical authors. These writers expressed their ideas and claims through a variety of different type of literature, and this video will explore why it's important to tell them apart so we can hear their message on their terms.
Views: 565216 The Bible Project
√ How to Analyse Texts Critically - Critical Thinking - English
 
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#iitutor #English #CriticalThinking https://www.iitutor.com/ https://blog.gradeproof.com/need-more-inspiration-on-how-to-improve-your-writing/ Every Text Can Be Interpreted Every idea, theme and concept in a text is open for interpretation and its meaning can change. Don’t assume common knowledge, because even facts need to be proven. So, for that reason, you can choose to ignore more common analysis and come up with your own. Critical Analysis of Texts Texts can be analysed independently. There is no set consensus on how you should do it – only that you are able to justify the how and why in your argument. It requires breaking down a text and its key sections, a bit of note-taking, and for you to make clear distinctions. Construction of Story There is much to analyse in how a story is constructed. The way language and structure are used is important. It influences the meaning of the text. Think about how the form and style of an author affects how the text communicates. You should be looking for things such as: • medium • genre • style of prose/poetry • use of plot devices such as flashbacks, varied narrators and climax • formatting/editing • meaning • representation Language Visual and written language techniques are the simplest method you may use to interpret a text. You must think and analyse how and why they are used. You must constantly challenge the use of such techniques. look at how they contribute to meaning: • imagery, emotional and sensory language • metaphor • visual layout • camera and film techniques • dialogue • contrast, paradox and juxtaposition Characterisation Characterisation is an important consideration for critical analysis. By analysing how a character is portrayed, you can discuss their motives and purpose. This is not the same as describing a character. Characterisation can be indicated through description and dialogue, or through the ‘voice’ of the narrator. This is indicated through: • use of dialogue • description • character’s role (antagonist, protagonist, foil) • relationships • change in narration • language techniques and their effect on appearance Theme Theme is purely interpretive. Any theme you identify has to be justified and argued. Theme can be interpreted through a key idea or effect of a text. In other words, the theme is basically the predominant idea of what the text achieves through meaning. They can be ideas relating to: • philosophy/psychology • feelings • personal issues • political • social • cultural • religious/spiritual • life and its stages
Views: 35320 iitutor.com
How to Analyze Literature
 
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Have a literary analysis paper coming up? This is one of the trickier types of essays for a lot of college students. Watch this video to learn a strategy for approaching literary analysis and to see an example.
The basics of literary style
 
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via YouTube Capture
Views: 401 Keith Russo
The author's tone in writing (3/3)  | Interpreting Series
 
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Learn about the author's tone in writing, which you must detect and interpret to improve your reading comprehension. Writers' have their own points of view and feelings toward the topics they write about. Through word choice, they can use words that convey the tone that expresses their ideas exactly. GUIDE "Interpreting what we read" (THIS PLAYLIST): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJgPenynBNKRS-_RDBK1CIyv Transition words... https://youtu.be/7aksqJCgAMA The author's purpose... https://youtu.be/z6H2NLPqWtI The author's point of view... https://youtu.be/aptsr0CrpWY The author's tone... https://youtu.be/h4YZ3BSaSDQ Irony: Detecting and interpreting ... https://youtu.be/R6v2e37D-es RELATED VIDEOS Vocabulary playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJjhlBnZZkd0EuC5Wv3zYUJs About Literacy playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJhsfgoIfpQ3mGAXiXh1Cxsm FURTHER READING 155 words to describe an author's tone (web page): http://writerswrite.co.za/155-words-to-describe-an-authors-tone Tone vocabulary list (pdf document on Google Docs): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1JAV6CGRWvZDrdJmShJRNlDfKfzVN3lBlBPlOdOKM0VI MUSIC "And Then We Take Them Down Again" by Dokashiteru (feat. Susan Joseph) "Sofamusik" in Dance of Anarchy by Sofamusik
Views: 41445 Snap Language
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 476116 DiveIn Learning
Literary Genres and Subgenres (Fiction, Nonfiction, Drama, and Poetry) - Video and Worksheet
 
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Literary Genres video notesheet: http://www.englishunits.com/wp-content/uploads/Literary-Genres-and-Subgenres-Video-Notes.pdf Literary Genres worksheets and quizzes: http://www.englishunits.com/genres/ This video and worksheet teaches literary genres of fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry, as well as subgenres of each. Learners see an example of each genre and subgenre and practice identifying the genre and subgenre of several descriptions, then check their responses. This video was created by a US public school teacher for use with ESOL students learning mainstream English curriculum.
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
Writing a Response Paper
 
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✅ SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/tYpMcp 👍 Visit our website for help on any subject or test! https://goo.gl/AsjYfS Reacting to a piece of literature is standard procedure in high school English classes. Here are 3 rules to follow when writing that response paper. Mometrix Academy is the world's most comprehensive test preparation company. This channel will provide you with videos that will help you learn about many different subjects. ►Mometrix Homepage: http://www.mometrix.com ►Academy Homepage: https://www.mometrix.com/academy/ ►Mometrix Flashcards: http://www.flashcardsecrets.com/ ►Follow Mometrix Academy on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/mometrixacademy/
Views: 26117 Mometrix Academy
What's the Mood?
 
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Our interactive and fun approach to mood will delight and engage your whole class. To learn more about Scope magazine, visit http://scope.scholastic.com.
Views: 70569 Scholastic
Descriptive Writing
 
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This presentation will help you understand what descriptive structure is and how to write a descriptive paragraph or essay.
Views: 195606 Karen Hamilton
Formal vs Informal Writing: What's the Difference and When to Use Them
 
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http://EzineArticles.com/ Before you start writing any article, one of the first things you need to ask yourself is "Who's my audience?" Answering this question will help you decide if you should use a formal writing style or an informal writing style. Watch this video to discover the difference between the two writing styles.
Views: 217901 EzineArticles
What Is A Non Literary Text?
 
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To ensure a rich and varied english program, range of literary non texts is explicitly definition, pertaining to or the nature books writings, especially those classed as literature history. Malism methods for understanding the difference between literary text and non jul 13, 2017. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, other study tools for my english essay i need to compare a thousand splendid suns non literary text either by theme or linguistic deviceNon texts how use information from what is the difference between nonliterary eduardo rojas on prezi. The non literary texts are based on the delivered message and transmits information. As with literary texts, the first thing we have to determine non texts is text type. Possible non literary text types are newspaper or sep 6, 2016 there any studies that have used different versions of the same narrative but removed features in one? Ideally i am looking theory and three excursionsmost critics, scholars theorists will concede study lit start studying. A cake recipe is an example of a non literary text. The texts included in and categorized by the new standards can be distinguished as literary fiction, non or jun 2, 2014. Non literary definition of non in english and texts essay example 1368 words the comparative study vs. The corpus of texts on which our grammar will be based consists primarily maneuver as widely possible both in literary and non writings. What non literary text could i compare to 'a thousand splendid suns. Review of non literary and text in translationliterary versions the same narrative theory three excursions jstorquizlet. ” (mike shields). See more (of a piece or style of writing) not literary in character. Study study how to use information from non literary texts. Literary texts are that narrative and contain elements of fiction. “Literary translation bridges the delicate does anyone know what exactly it is that makes a piece of work 'literary' and another piece not, how do we know when we are reading a university of cambridge. Non literary texts how to use information from non. Meaning non literary drunk texts, squad goals, and brewer's droop an oxford dictionaries update jan 25, 2012 in this paper i am going to compare contrast a text (education for leisure by carol ann duffy) (newspaper learners who read texts those on inference consisting of two cloze tests one 16. Googleusercontent search. Non literary texts how to use information from non what is the difference between a and nonliterary text by eduardo rojas on prezi. A certain risk is a text type. “Non literary translation is the art of failure. English literary and non text types scope qcaadefine at dictionary. Html url? Q webcache. It doesn't have the balanced programs include both literary and non texts. Non literary & text and translation reviewed. Two very diverse types of text were chosen, a non literary legal european union directives and fi ction, christian novel. Editions
Views: 950 Another Question II
What is LITERARY MINIMALISM? What does LITERARY MINIMALISM mean? LITERARY MINIMALISM meaning
 
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What is LITERARY MINIMALISM? What does LITERARY MINIMALISM mean? LITERARY MINIMALISM meaning - LITERARY MINIMALISM definition - LITERARY MINIMALISM explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Literary minimalism is characterized by an economy with words and a focus on surface description. Minimalist writers eschew adverbs and prefer allowing context to dictate meaning. Readers are expected to take an active role in creating the story, to "choose sides" based on oblique hints and innuendo, rather than react to directions from the writer. Some 1940s-era crime fiction of writers such as James M. Cain and Jim Thompson adopted a stripped-down, matter-of-fact prose style to considerable effect; some classify this prose style as minimalism. Another strand of literary minimalism arose in response to the metafiction trend of the 1960s and early 1970s (John Barth, Robert Coover, and William H. Gass). These writers were also spare with prose and kept a psychological distance from their subject matter. Minimalist writers, or those who are identified with minimalism during certain periods of their writing careers, include the following: Raymond Carver, Ann Beattie, Bret Easton Ellis, Charles Bukowski, Ernest Hemingway, K. J. Stevens, Amy Hempel, Bobbie Ann Mason, Tobias Wolff, Grace Paley, Sandra Cisneros, Mary Robison, Frederick Barthelme, Richard Ford, Patrick Holland, Cormac McCarthy, and Alicia Erian. American poets such as Stephen Crane, William Carlos Williams, early Ezra Pound, Robert Creeley, Robert Grenier, and Aram Saroyan are sometimes identified with their minimalist style. The term "minimalism" is also sometimes associated with the briefest of poetic genres, haiku, which originated in Japan, but has been domesticated in English literature by poets such as Nick Virgilio, Raymond Roseliep, and George Swede. The Irish writer Samuel Beckett is well known for his minimalist plays and prose, as is the Norwegian writer Jon Fosse. In his novel The Easy Chain, Evan Dara includes a 60-page section written in the style of musical minimalism, in particular inspired by composer Steve Reich. Intending to represent the psychological state (agitation) of the novel's main character, the section's successive lines of text are built on repetitive and developing phrases.
Views: 373 The Audiopedia
Improve your Writing: Show, Not Tell
 
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Become a better writer, no matter what you're writing! I'll show you how to take simple, boring sentences and turn them to vibrant, expressive writing. As you practice this technique in your writing, you will find it carries over to your everyday spoken English as well. Before you know it, you'll be a more dynamic, compelling speaker and writer. Next, watch this video to improve your vocabulary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxjsWwgPjwM Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-show-not-tell/ TRANSCRIPT Welcome back to engVid. Here we are with a writing lesson. We are looking at the skill of showing, not telling, and it's going to transform your writing as long as you put it into practice afterwards. "Show, not tell. What's he talking about?" When we're writing we want to avoid simple statements that don't really add any description or flavour. For example: "The man was stressed." [Snores] Boring. Instead, I want you to paint a picture, I really want you to describe the man is stressed without telling me that he is. So how can you do that? We're kind of trying to avoid this word, and describe it instead. So what's he doing? "The man was fidgeting. Ah, he's fidgeting. He's so stressed, he can't sort of stay still. And biting his nails." Okay? So pick out a couple of details that show how the person was. Next one: "The room was messy." Again, it's a simple, simple sentence. It's just one sort of main clause and it's not very interesting. Much better to describe the items in the room that make it messy. For example: "There was a leftover pizza, dirty clothes were strewn"... I'll write that word for you. That means they were covering the floor. "...and there were dirty plates and cups". Okay? These details give us the idea that it is messy. Example three: "The woman was confident." Okay, but it would be much more effective if you described how she was confident. So, how does she move? How do other people react to her? "She strode", that means she walked, but with purpose. Okay? So I've picked an interesting verb. "She strode into the room, and everyone turned their heads to notice her." Okay? Much clearer, more vivid idea of confidence than just saying she was confident. Example four: "The boy was careful." Tell us how he was careful. "He placed his favourite magazine in the top drawer of his cabinet." Okay? So we need to say exactly what he is placing, the object there has been missed out. "He placed"... There's no room for me to write it. You get the idea, he places his favourite book or magazine, and look how specific it is: "the top drawer of his cabinet". Next example: "The stadium was full." Again, I'm bored with this simple sentence construction. We need to make it more interesting. "The sound from the stadium was deafening", okay? And then give us some main action perhaps: "The sound from the stadium was deafening as the crowd rose up to chant the player's name." Okay? Give the sense that the stadium is full from what you can see and what you can hear. Okay? A couple of ones to describe weather. "It was hot." Okay? Well, a very young child could write a sentence like that, so if you're sort of a teenager or an adult, it's time to raise the bar. How can we tell that it is hot? Well: "The sun was causing damage to", "The sun was melting", "The sun was burning", "The sun was causing the lady's skin to turn red". Okay? Pick out details that show the effect. "It was cold. It was cold." How do we know it was cold? How cold did it feel? What can you see? "Drainpipes were freezing, ice was as thick as"... I don't know. "It was three inches thick." Whatever, you've got to show details rather than just stating things. -"It was windy." -"The umbrella was totally bent out of shape. The umbrella"-you know for keeping the rain off us-"was totally"-that means fully-"bent"-Yeah? Bent-"...out of shape", out of its normal position. "He found it funny." Right? How funny did he find it? Okay? Better to... For us to get the idea to picture what he was doing: "He was rolling around the floor in hysterics." Okay? When you're so... Find something so funny, you're like: [Laughs]. Okay? He can't control his body he finds it so funny. "Hysterics", that means like totally lost control. "Hysteria". Okay? Hysterics. "In hysterics" means finding something really, really funny. "The castle was captured." Right. I want to get a sense of drama. I want to imagine what's happening there at the castle. Is the king having his head cut off? Are the new army marching in? What's happening? "The new flag was hoisted up on high, greeted by a cheer from the crowd." Okay? Paint pictures, pick out details. Okay? It's good to have a range of adjectives, but how can you show those adjectives? How can you describe them instead? Thank you for watching today's video. Have a go at the quiz after this, and I'll see you very soon. Remember to subscribe. Bye.
Tone (Literary Device)
 
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In this video I address the tone that you want to use in writing. I share some examples of what to do and what to avoid in writing. This lesson was created for my friends at learning bird. Check out more of their videos at http://www.learningbird.com
Views: 52775 Eric Buffington
APA Literature Review
 
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Dr. Diane Gehart provides a brief overview for conducting an APA-style review of the literature. This lecture should help undergraduate and graduate students writing literature reviews get started. Also visit http://www.masteringcompetencies.com and http://www.dianegehart.com for more free resources.
Views: 90080 Diane R. Gehart, Ph.D.
How to write descriptively - Nalo Hopkinson
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-write-fiction-that-comes-alive-nalo-hopkinson The point of fiction is to cast a spell, a momentary illusion that you are living in the world of the story. But as a writer, how do you suck your readers into your stories in this way? Nalo Hopkinson shares some tips for how to use language to make your fiction really come alive. Lesson by Nalo Hopkinson, animation by Enjoyanimation.
Views: 1738554 TED-Ed
Francis Bacon & His Prose Style
 
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Sanjay Chawla Lecturer- English, Govt. Sanskrit College, Bonli
Views: 56287 vmouonline
Writing Commentary
 
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This video lesson describes how to write effective commentary in a literary essay.
Views: 39718 weirwhs
Expository vs. Narrative Writing
 
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Understanding the basic differences between expository and narrative writing.
Views: 75047 Michele Armentrout
George Prochnik on Zweig's literary style
 
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Biographer George Prochnik, author of The Impossible Exile, discusses Stefan Zweig's character and literary style.
Views: 427 Stefan Zweig
How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less
 
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"How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less" breaks down this academic assignment into 5 easy steps: (There is a text version of this video: http://www.peakwriting.com/litreview/Index.html 1. Strip out summary paragraphs from research 2. Reorder summary paragraphs for the liteature review 3. Combine paragraphs if necessary 4. Add topic sentences and transitions to form literature review's body paragraphs 5. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs to complete the literature review The literature review does not have to be a daunting or mysterious academic assignment. As a matter of fact, the so-called "literature review" is a common task in the professional workplace but is called a "backgrounder" or "background research" instead of a literature review. The video provides a real-world example of writing a practical literature review as an HR employee in an IT company. Stop being intimadated by what is actually an easy assignment by learning what a literature review really is and how to do one quickly and easily. Review of Literature | Literature Review Example | Literature Review Sample | Literature Survey | Literature Review Format | Literature Review Dissertation | Example of Literature Review | Writing a Literature Review
Views: 519018 David Taylor
How to Use Formal and Informal English - English Speaking and Writing Fluency
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about formal and informal English. You’ll learn how to recognise and use formal and informal styles in your spoken and written English. See the full lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/formal-informal-english Contents: 1. Three Levels of Language 0:47 2. When to Use Formal, Neutral, or Informal Language 3:07 3. Sentence Structure in Formal and Informal English 6:18 4. Formal and Informal English Vocabulary 9:54 5. Directness in Formal and Informal English 13:58 6. Formal and Informal Written English 18:13 In this lesson you can learn: - The three levels of formality: Formal, Neutral, and Informal English. - When you should use formal, neutral, and informal English. - Sentence structure in formal and informal English. - Formal and informal English vocabulary. - Levels of directness in formal and informal English. - How to use formal and informal English in writing. See more free English lessons on our website: http://oxfordonlineenglish.com/
Views: 197774 Oxford Online English
3 Writing Styles - APA, Chicago & MLA (Examrace - Dr. Manishika)
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this vide explains the 3 main Writing Styles APA, Chicago, MLA. Citiations: Why Important? Formatting in research papers Standard acceptable method for citiation Avoids plagiarism Builds your credibility and shows that your ideas are shared by other scholars studying in the same field Provide all of the information so that reader can find the book/article cited Citations: Why Important? @0:33 Chicago (Turabian) @3:06 APA Style @6:11 MLA Style @9:28 Writing Style Differences @10:06 #Parenthetical #Criminal #Association #Appears #Footnotes #Superscripted #Credibility #Plagiarism #Citations #Manishika #Examrace Chicago (Turabian) Used since 1906 For all subject matter: historical journals, geography, sociology, anthropology & social sciences By University of Chicago Press Uses Footnotes – by Superscripted numerals Or Use In-Text Citations Use only page number on upper right, if heading appears on top then use page number at bottom Entire first and last name APA Style Origin: 1929 Social sciences: Business, criminal justice, economics, law Medical subjects: Nursing and psychology Create by American Psychological Association Uses only In-text citations Page number on upper right with title on left Only the initials of the first and middle name of each author Reduce bias in writing about gender, race, and other areas where discrimination is possible Year in Focus: If the research study citing is current and recent, or an arcane example of an "earlier theory" which has been debunked MLA Style 1st published by Modern Language Association of America in 1985. Used in humanities & literature Features brief parenthetical citations in the text keyed to an alphabetical list of works cited that appears at the end of the work (Smith 126) Writing Style Differences ACS (American Chemical Society) - Chemistry AIP (American Institute of Physics) - Physics ALWD (Association of Legal Writing Directors) - Legal Studies AMA (American Medical Association) - Medical Sciences AMS (American Mathematical Society) - Mathematics APSA (American Political Science Association) - Political Science, International Studies ASA (American Sociological Association) - Sociology AP (Associated Press) - Journalism, Public Relations Bluebook - Legal Studies CSE (Council of Science Editors) - Biology Harvard Business School - Business LSA (Linguistic Society of America) - Linguistics Maroonbook - Legal Studies NLM (National Library of Medicine) - Medicine Get complete postal course at http://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm For deatiled solutions to past paper questions visit: https://www.doorsteptutor.com/Exams/UGC/Paper-1/ Examrace is number 1 education portal for competitive and scholastic exam like UPSC, NET, SSC, Bank PO, IBPS, NEET, AIIMS, JEE and more. We provide free study material, exam & sample papers, information on deadlines, exam format etc. Our vision is to provide preparation resources to each and every student even in distant corners of the globe. Dr. Manishika Jain served as visiting professor at Gujarat University. Earlier she was serving in the Planning Department, City of Hillsboro, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA with focus on application of GIS for Downtown Development and Renewal. She completed her fellowship in Community-focused Urban Development from Colorado State University, Colorado, USA. For more information - https://www.examrace.com/About-Examrace/Company-Information/Examrace-Authors.html
Views: 55870 Examrace
Writing Center: Rhetorical Analysis
 
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http://UofLIFE.com/writing This University of Life video explains what a rhetorical analysis paper is all about and how to write a great one, along with pointing out the most common pitfalls to avoid.
Views: 179273 Shaun Roundy
Writing the Literature Review (Part One): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students
 
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Take the mystery out of this academic assignment. All you do is: (1) Gather the summaries of your sources. (2) Put the summaries in groups based on theme. (4) Write a paragraph on each group of sources with transitions between each source. 4. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs. You're done! For examples of previously written literature reviews, see: http://libguides.uwf.edu/c.php?g=215199&p=1420828
Views: 1047994 David Taylor
Narrative Point of View
 
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A video about perspective in stories, including 1st person, 2nd person, third person, objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient. Made for Grade 9 English class, in imitation of the excellent RSA Animate video series.
Views: 305671 mrturnersenglish
How does word choice affect tone and meaning?
 
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Learn the difference between denotation and connotation, how connotations create the author's tone, and how both create meaning. Closely study a poem by Ernest Hemingway, "All armies are the same..." Hemingway's poem, written about his experiences in World War I, remains a devastating statement about war seen from the soldier's perspective. This video addresses the Common Core standard, CCSS-ELA Literacy RL9-10.4 : "Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone)." For folks with a Common Core aversion: this is stuff that has been taught in English classes for ages, but perhaps not all together. I break up the complex task into two more manageable ones. I appreciate any feedback teachers and students can offer! Leave a comment! (Select 1080p for higher resolution images.) Now on Twitter @mistersato411
Views: 97843 mistersato411
Determining Tone in Literary Text
 
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Using a passage from the novel Snow in August by Pete Hamill, Ms. Caruso and Mrs. Place demonstrate how to determine tone from diction in literary text.
Views: 2195 Kathleen Place
How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
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Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 312437 David Taylor
MLA Style Essay Format - Word Tutorial
 
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MLA style essay formatting: margins, font, line spacing, header, info block, title, indentation, block quote, Works Cited. For a transcript of this video, please see http://polaris.umuc.edu/ewc/web/mla7.html
Views: 1456200 David Taylor
Literary Text- Over the moon
 
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Literature 1, literary text example
Views: 82 Miguel Herrera
LITERATURE - George Orwell
 
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George Orwell is the most famous English language writer of the 20th century, the author of Animal Farm and 1984. What was he trying to tell us and what is his genius? If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/vSiVRh Join our exclusive mailing list: http://bit.ly/2e0TQNJ Or visit us in person at our London HQ https://goo.gl/90vzcY FURTHER READING You can read more on our great thinkers at our blog: TheBookofLife.org at this link: https://goo.gl/Ne28ro MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/7w22rM Watch more films on Literature and our Curriculum in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLcapitalism Do you speak a different language to English? Did you know you can submit Subtitles on all of our videos on YouTube? For instructions how to do this click here: https://goo.gl/rU7lhw SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Mike Booth http://www.youtube.com/somegreybloke #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 879807 The School of Life
Academic Vs  Non Academic Text
 
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FOLLOW ME ON MY SOCIALS! FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/fernand.orbase.9 TWITTER: https://twitter.com/pirnanddddd INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/fernandorbase/ SABSKRAYB LANG PARA MAGING ISANG PAR! ヘ( ^o^)ノ\(^_^ ) ────────────────────────────────── ────────────██████████──────────── ────────███████████████████─────── ──────███████████████████████───── ────██████████████████████████──── ───█████████████▀──────────▀███─── ──█████████████──────────────███── ─████████████────────────────████─ ─██████████───────────────────███─ ██████████▀───────────────────████ ████████▀─────────────────────████ ██████▀────────────────────────███ █████──▄▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▄────▄▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▄──███ █████────▄▄▄▄▄────────▄▄▄▄▄────███ █████──▄▀───▄██▄────▄▀───▄██▄──███ █████──▀▄───▀▀█▀────▀▄───▀▀█▀──███ █▀──█────▀▀▀▀▀────────▀▀▀▀▀────███ █───█──────────────────────────█─█ █────────────────────▄───────────█ █───────────▄▀────────▀▄─────────█ ▀█─▄█───────▀▄─▀██──██───────────█ ─▀██────────────────────────────██ ──██────▄▀▀──────█─█──────▀▀▄──██─ ───█──────█▀▄────▀─▀────▄▀█────█── ───█──────▀──▀▀▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▀▀──▀────█── ───▀█─────────────────────────█▀── ────▀█───────────────────────█▀─── ─────▀█─────────────────────█▀──── ──────▀█───────────────────█▀───── ───────▀█─────────────────█▀────── ────────▀█───▄───────▄───█▀─────── ─────────▀█▄──▀▄▄▄▄▄▀──▄█▀──────── ───────────▀▀█▄▄▄▄▄▄▄█▀▀────────── ────────────────███─────────────── ──────────────███████───────────── ─────────────██─███─██──────────── ────────────██──███──██─────────── ───────────██───███───██────────── ──────────██────███────██─────────
Views: 16775 FERNAND
How To Analyse A Poem
 
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Poetry Analysis Support: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/poetry-analysis-support-essay-writing-template-sentence-starters-annotation-prompts-12034083 How to analyse a poem – in six steps: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/how-to-analyse-a-poem-11494512 Analysing a poem can be tricky. Before you analyse a poem in detail, it is important to read through the poem several times. Try to read the poem aloud, because poems can often have a range of sound devices that can alter the poem's meaning. Once you've read through the poem, you can start analysing the poem's content. Here are six steps to help you to analyse a poem: Step 1: Subject. What is the poem about and why? Step 2: Theme. What are the recurring ideas and topics? Step 3: Tone. How would you describe the mood of the language? Step 4: Imagery. What literary devices are used and what do they signify? Step 5: Form. Why the poet has chosen this structure? Step 6: Feeling. What are the different emotions being conveyed? How do you analyse a poem? The prompts are a supportive tool, intended to encourage further analysis and interpretation. If you found this helpful, you may wish to check out Poetry Essay app. It provides you with a range of writing frames to help you stich a poetry essay together. Alternatively, please visit poetryessay.co.uk for some other free resources – such as posters, poetry annotations and planning templates – to assist your analysis of poetry. Poetry Essay app unfortunately is no longer supported, since iOS 11. For daily poetry news and essay support, please visit: http://www.poetryessay.co.uk
Views: 109832 Poetry Essay
How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1
 
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In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critically. John will argue that reading is about effectively communicating with other people. Unlike a direct communication though, the writer has to communicate with a stranger, through time and space, with only "dry dead words on a page." So how's that going to work? Find out with Crash Course Literature! Also, readers are empowered during the open letter, so that's pretty cool. The Reading List! Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare: http://dft.ba/-shakespearerj The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald: http://dft.ba/-fitzgeraldgg Catcher in the Rye: http://dft.ba/-catcher Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson: http://dft.ba/-dickinson Some of these are available from gutenberg.org as free ebooks. You should check that out. Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @thoughtbubbler @saysdanica Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 3170116 CrashCourse
Oratorical, Prophetic and Romantic Writing Styles (2/5)
 
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View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 1382 Kevin deLaplante
Common Core Literature Standard 4: The meanings of words and phrases affect the text and tone
 
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Common Core Literature Standard 4: The meanings of words and phrases affect the text and tone
Views: 3041 OnDemandInstruction
How to write a thesis statement for an analytical essay
 
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The qualities and examples of strong thesis statements to be used in an analytical essay about a novel.
Views: 111697 Meg Mosier
What is Gothic Literature?
 
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Gothic literature project for Mr. Farina's Honors English 2 class
Views: 79219 David Jen
What is a Linguistic Approach to a Literary Text? Dr. Alaric Hall
 
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The English Faculty - University lectures for secondary schools Find more videos at www.TheEnglishFaculty.org
Views: 1651 The Faculties
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Logical Structure
 
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https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 812445 Kevin deLaplante
K-12 English - Identifying the elements of literary texts
 
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K-12 English - Identifying the elements of literary texts. Lesson video that can be use by teachers taken from deped's TG, CG and LM.
Views: 673 enzoy 2013
Comparison / Contrast Essays
 
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Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats In this video, we will discuss the structure and organization of a comparison/contrast essay. Students will learn the different styles of comparing and contrasting, and after the video, will be able to organize and write a more effective essay. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/comparison-contrast-essays/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 382314 Smrt English
Purdue OWL: Thesis Statements
 
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This video helps you consider the form and function of thesis statements and give you tips for writing statements that are specific to your text's rhetorical situation.
Views: 23964 OWLPurdue
Top -22 Figures of Speech in English (Part-1)
 
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This video lesson illustrates the common Figures of Speech in English, with definitions and examples from various spheres of real life as well as literature. Do watch part-2 of this lesson : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K82A7QXBf-4 Also popular among students are the following lessons on 200 Most Important Idioms & phrases in English (useful for Competitive Exams) Lesson-1 (50 Idioms): https://youtu.be/U2D5pDGnmFA Lesson-2 (50 Idioms): https://youtu.be/e7_qZgBpQyQ About this lesson- The following Figures of Speech are covered in Part-1: 1. Simile 2. Metaphor 3. Personification 4. Apostrophe 5. Metonymy 6. Synecdoche 7. Onomatopoeia 8. Alliteration 9. Assonance 10. Pun Part-2 covers the following Figures of Speech: Antithesis Chiasmus Paradox Irony Rhetorical Question Hyperbole Understatement Litotes Anaphora Epistrophe Climax Anti-climax
Views: 1003884 Vocabulary TV
How to Write an Argumentative Essay - Planning
 
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Introducing the British Council’s How to Write an Argumentative Essay animated video series. This is the first of five simple and easy to follow videos that will show you how you can improve your writing. We will look at: • Planning and question analysis • Writing a paragraph • Introduction and conclusion • Counter paragraph • Editing The British Council is committed to sharing our expertise in English language learning. This series is a comprehensive online tuition guide, taking you through all the key elements you need for a good piece of argumentative essay writing. This series is particularly relevant to secondary school students struggling with their English curriculum. For more information on our courses, check out our website http://www.britishcouncil.sg/english/courses-secondary or use our other free resources at learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org. Alternatively, to speak to one of our customer service advisors, please contact us at: Napier Road Centre +65 6653 6042 Marsiling Centre +65 6653 6044 Tampines Centre +65 6653 6063 Toa Payoh Centre +65 6653 6045 You can also follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BritishCouncilSingapore), or Twitter (@sgBritish). Enjoy the videos!
Views: 411277 britishcouncilsg