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COLREG Lights, Shapes and Sound Signals
 
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The learning objective of this section is to get acquainted with the different lights, shapes and sound signals that may be used by different types of vessels Lights and shapes Visibility of lights Lights displayed by power-driven vessels underway Lights for vessels towing and pushing Lights for sailing and rowing vessels Lights for fishing vessels Lights for vessels not under command or restricted in their ability to manoeuvre Lights for vessels constrained by their draught Lights for pilot vessels Lights for vessels anchored and aground Lights for seaplanes Definitions of whistle Equipment Manoeuvring and warning signals, using whistle or lights Sound signals to be used in restricted visibility Signals to be used to attract attention Distress signals Annexes ANNEX I – Positioning and technical details of lights and shapes ANNEX II – Additional signals for fishing vessels fishing in close proximity ANNEX III – Technical details of sound signal appliances ANNEX IV – Distress signals COLREG Rule 34 Warning Signals for Vessels In Sight Of Each Other https://youtu.be/dQ1VkgDt1x4 COLREG Rule 34 Signals When In Sight In A Narrow Channel https://youtu.be/8lOk46HFHe4 COLREG Rule 31 Seaplanes And WIG Craft https://youtu.be/7E5v1nSNmDk COLREG Rule 29 & Rule 35 Pilot Vessels On Duty https://youtu.be/HzVKJ9051dM COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Mine Clearing Operations https://youtu.be/1G23KnMi66Y COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Dredging OR Underwater Operations https://youtu.be/Gfry8xTJiuE COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Restricted, But Not Mine Clearin https://youtu.be/OJpSE0cbB48 COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Not Under Command https://youtu.be/8JflJu0Rd1k COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Trawling https://youtu.be/KEdFc53Czec COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Fishing Other Than Trawling https://youtu.be/n3PqV9rX7QA COLREG Rule 25 & Rule 35 Sailing Vessels and Vessels Under Oars https://youtu.be/z9rgrVvodZs COLREG Rule 24 Vessel Puching Ahead Or Rowing Other Vessels Alongside https://youtu.be/C1KE9IbQky8 COLREG Rule 24, Rule 27 And Rule 35 A Vessel Engaged In Towing https://youtu.be/kH1ZSgVhvdE COLREG Rule 23 & Rule 35 Power Driven Vessels https://youtu.be/0Jzo3AxowJU COLREG Rule 24 & Rule 35 A Vessel Being Towed https://youtu.be/jFSNvRtP3Ds COLREG Rule 21 & Annex 1 Light And Shapes https://youtu.be/m1Gmh2bJe9w COLREG Rule 20 & 32 Light And Shapes Signals https://youtu.be/P_WAz9cEYKo COLREG Rule 30 And Rule 35 A Vessel At Anchor https://youtu.be/DQz-TvHHobU COLREG Rule 30 A Vessel Aground https://youtu.be/v4FQt2NF6uk Don't Forget to subscribe US Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683
Views: 49331 Marine Online
A signalman aboard a US ship underway at sea sending blinker signal at night in t...HD Stock Footage
 
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Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675075949_United-States-signalman_sending-blinker_men-aboard-boat_view-of-sunrise Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. A signalman aboard a US ship underway at sea sending blinker signal at night in the United States. US submarines at a harbor in the United States. A ship underway at sea off the coast of United States. Using signal lamp, Signalman aboard the ship is sending morse code blinker at night (though first dawn light of sunrise is visible). Low mountains in the background. Men aboard a boat underway. The sunrise view. (Unrelated: Clip ends with brief view of Kodak "china girl" for color timing. Lettering beside this "china girl" or "leader lady" indicates Kodak 79 ECO and she is wearing a 1960's psychedelic shirt or blouse) Location: United States. Date: 1945. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.
Views: 23849 CriticalPast
sound and light signal (SOLAS)
 
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This video show the sound and light information in voyage the vessel.
Views: 18317 Ahmad Albab Happy
24   sound signals 1
 
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Here are the sound signal rules to be followed by vessels in restricted visibility: A power-driven vessel underway must sound one prolonged blast every two minutes. A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water must sound two prolonged blasts every 2 minutes with an interval of about 2 seconds between them. A vessel not under command; a vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver, whether underway or at anchor; a vessel constrained by her draft; a sailing vessel; a vessel engaged in fishing, whether underway or at anchor; or a vessel engaged in towing or pushing another vessel must sound one prolonged blast plus two short blasts every two minutes. A vessel at anchor must ring the bell rapidly for 5 seconds every one minute. A vessel at anchor of 100 meters or more in length is required to ring the bell rapidly for 5 seconds every one minute, and immediately after the ringing of the bell to sound the gong for 5 seconds in the aft part of the vessel.
SOS Distress Signal by Light and Sound from a Small Vessel
 
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Video animation to show a low-tech way of transmitting distress: hand-held torch and a horn blown by the user. The sound and light signals are not synchronised: this is likely if different people are using the torch and horn; it will also seem to be the case when observed at a distance. It can be better to concentrate on either the light or the sound signal. Full details: http://sailskills.co.uk/colregs/Sailskills_distress_SOS.html
Views: 27932 P J
U.S. NAVY SIGNAL CORPS FLAG SEMAPHORE /  BLINKER / MORSE CODE TRAINING FILM  85664
 
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This fascinating 1943 U.S. Navy training film shows "How to Signal" using flag hoists, semaphore, and blinker to present morse code messages. The film was produced by F.H. Hargove of the Prior Motion Picture Company in New York and supposedly narrated by "Radcliffe Hall" (like a pseudonym for a radio announcer). A review in "Motor Boating" magazine noted that "the film shows pictorially how to learn the codes in the International Flag, Semaphore and Blinker systems of Communication. Expert signal men in the U.S. service serve as instructors and demonstrate the correct methods of using these three methods. It is designed so that the film may be repeated again and again until the student becomes familiar with the signal flags and positions of the semaphore, and the light flashes of the blinker…" Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night. The use of lights for spelling out messages in Morse code dates back to 1867. With the advent of electric lights in the 1890s, the "blinker light" became an effective tool for signaling. Most widely used by naval ships, blinker lights were essential for merchant ships sailing in wartime convoys and observing radio silence. Blinker has remained a useful backup for merchant vessels, and until the late 1980s deck officers were trained in its use. Usually however, blinker work was done by the Radio Officer. Beginning in the 1930s, both civilian and military pilots were required to be able to use Morse code, both for use with early communications systems and for identification of navigational beacons which transmitted continuous two- or three-letter identifiers in Morse code. Aeronautical charts show the identifier of each navigational aid next to its location on the map. Radio telegraphy using Morse code was vital during World War II, especially in carrying messages between the warships and the naval bases of the belligerents. Long-range ship-to-ship communication was by radio telegraphy, using encrypted messages, because the voice radio systems on ships then were quite limited in both their range and their security. Radiotelegraphy was also extensively used by warplanes, especially by long-range patrol planes that were sent out by those navies to scout for enemy warships, cargo ships, and troop ships. Morse code is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment. The International Morse Code encodes the ISO basic Latin alphabet, some extra Latin letters, the Arabic numerals and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals (prosigns) as standardized sequences of short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes", or "dits" and "dahs", as in amateur radio practice. Because many non-English natural languages use more than the 26 Roman letters, extensions to the Morse alphabet exist for those languages. Each Morse code symbol represents either a text character (letter or numeral) or a prosign and is represented by a unique sequence of dots and dashes. The duration of a dash is three times the duration of a dot. Each dot or dash is followed by a short silence, equal to the dot duration. The letters of a word are separated by a space equal to three dots (one dash), and the words are separated by a space equal to seven dots. The dot duration is the basic unit of time measurement in code transmission. To increase the speed of the communication, the code was designed so that the length of each character in Morse varies approximately inversely to its frequency of occurrence in English. Thus the most common letter in English, the letter "E", has the shortest code, a single dot. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 28783 PeriscopeFilm
Light signalling device at sea: SOS Cyalume lightstick in case of search & rescue at sea
 
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For emergencies at sea or any other situation where search & rescue needs to be initiated, drawing attention to your location is very important. Cyalume offers the signalling device SOS or its Snaplight lightstick of 6’’ (15cm) that allows an easy and efficient way for rescuers to locate you quickly . Cyalume lightsticks work without batteries. They provide an instant, long lasting light source after being activated which allows you to signal your exact position in the dark and low light. A real ‘must have’ item for your safety kit, the lightsticks allow you to indicate your whereabouts in all conditions. Visible at up to 5km (SOS) or 1.5km (6‟ Snaplight) range, they enable search & rescue teams to get to you quickly and effectively. With a shelf life of up to 5 years (in their original packaging) and needing no maintenance, they allow you to be equipped in a prolonged and sustainable way. Ideal to keep in your lifejacket, and on board your boat! Do not hesitate ! Be prepared with Cyalume ! Visit our website at www.cyalume.shop
Views: 71 CyalumeEurope
Plants signal danger with flashes of light - TomoNews
 
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MADISON, WISCONSIN — Researchers have found that plants communicate distress by using their own signaling system. Subscribe to TomoNews ►►http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-TomoNews Watch more TomoNews ►►http://bit.ly/MoreTomoNews TomoNews is your best source for real news. We cover the funniest, craziest and most talked-about stories on the internet. If you’re laughing, we’re laughing. If you’re outraged, we’re outraged. We tell it like it is. And because we can animate stories, TomoNews brings you news like you’ve never seen before. Top TomoNews Stories - The most popular videos on TomoNews! http://bit.ly/Top_TomoNews_Stories You Idiot! - People doing stupid things http://bit.ly/You-Idiot Recent Uploads - The latest stories brought to you by TomoNews http://bit.ly/Latest-TomoNews Ultimate TomoNews Compilations - Can't get enough of TomoNews? This playlist is for you! New videos every day http://bit.ly/Ulitmate_TomoNews_Compilations Thanks for watching TomoNews! Like TomoNews on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Follow us on Twitter: @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Follow us on Instagram: @tomonewsus http://instagram.com/tomonewsus Visit our website for all the latest videos: http://us.tomonews.com Check out our Android app: http://bit.ly/1rddhCj Check out our iOS app: http://bit.ly/1gO3z1f Get top stories delivered to your inbox every day: http://bit.ly/tomo-newsletter
Views: 6766 TomoNews US
Flag Alphabet  ~ International maritime signal flags
 
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International maritime signal flags ~ Flag Alphabet The system of international maritime signal flags is one system of flag signals representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. It is a component of the International Code of Signals (ICS).[1] Naval flag signalling undoubtably developed in antiquity in order to coordinate naval action of multiple vessels. In the Peloponnesian War (431 -- 401 BCE) squadrons of Athenian galleys were described by Thucydides as engaging in coordinated maneuvers which would have required some kind of communication;[1] there is no record of how such communication was done but flags would have been the most likely method. Flags have long been used to identify a ship's owner or nationality, or the commander of a squadron. But the use of flags for signalling messages long remained primitive, as indicated by the 1530 instruction that when the Admiral doth doth shote of a pece of Ordnance, and set up his Banner of Council on Starrborde bottocke of his Shippe, everie shipps capten shall with spede go aborde the Admyrall to know his will.[2] Several wars with the Dutch in the 17th century prompted the English to issue instructions for the conduct of particular fleets, such as (in 1673) the Duke of York's "Instructions for the better Ordering of His Majesties Fleet in Sayling". Signals were primitive and rather ad hoc ("As soon as the Admiral shall loose his fore-top and fire a gun..."), and generally a one-way communication system, as only flagships carried a complete set of flags. In 1790 Admiral Lord Howe issued a new signal book for a numerary system using numeral flags to signal a number; the number, not the mast from which the flags flew, indicated the message. Other admirals tried various systems; it was not until 1799 that the Admiralty issued a standardized signal code system for the entire Royal Navy. This was limited to only the signals listed in the Signal-Book. In 1800 Captain Sir Home Popham devised a means of extending this: signals made with a special "Telegraph" flag refererred to a separate dictionary of numbered words and phrases.[3] A similar system was devised by Captain Marryat in 1817 "for the use of vessels employed in the merchant service".[4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_maritime_signal_flags Semaphore Flags : Semaphore Flags is the system for conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night.[citation needed] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semaphore VIdeo produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
Sea Signaling Devices from Flares to EPIRBs
 
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From Sailing Quarterly: Seamanship Vol. 2 Running Time 12 mins Captain Hal Sutphen demonstrates what you need to know about signaling for help with flares, EPIRBs, signal mirrors and more. SQ teams up with Cruising World and Sailing World Magazines for an in-depth look at Safety at Sea. This segment gives excellent detailed demonstrations of both Coast Guard approved and SOLAS rated devises including handheld flares, aerial flares and EPIRBs. Compare the differences and determine what equipment you want on board your boat. (502G) Buy the complete volume at https://youtu.be/a-99saxnhJY Also at... http://www.thesailingchannel.tv/seamanship-training-vol-2/ https://vimeo.com/ondemand/seamanship2
34   signaling flags
 
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When in sight of another vessel and no flares or radio are available you can use the signaling flags to call attention to a distress situation. If you require assistance you can use the Code Flag "Victor". Hoist the Code Flag "November" above the Code Flag "Charly" or a black square over a black ball if you are in imminent danger and immediate assistance is required . Code Flag "Whiskey" is used if you require medical assistance. Sound signals made with a whistle or a gong can also be helpful in attracting attention. If no signaling device is available use your arms. Stand facing in the direction of assistance and slowly raise and lower your arms. A combination of flags, audio and arm signals can be used to attract attention.
Greatland Rescue Laser Flare® and Rescue Laser Light™
 
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A new era in signaling and locating devices at sea and outdoors. Greatland Rescue Laser Flare® and Rescue Laser Light™ offer solutions to the problems associated with traditional pyrotechnics. This short video clip shows you what these laser flares are about. Filmed in May 2013 at the Holiday Oceanview Marina in the Philippines. We like to thank all participating sailors. Look on www.greatlandlaser.com for more details.
Views: 18514 Tropical Sailing Life
Boating Safety - Visual Distress Signals
 
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To View the Next Video in this Series Please Click Here: http://www.monkeysee.com/play/2811-boating-safety-driving-under-the-influence
Views: 5663 MonkeySee
Emergency light signal
 
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Signaling emergency inside a cave
Views: 2148 Bil Phillips
TRAILER: Signaling Devices from Flares to EPIRBs
 
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TRAILER From Sailing Quarterly: Seamanship Vol. 2 Captain Hal Sutphen demonstrates what you need to know about signaling for help with flares, EPIRBs, signal mirrors and more. SQ teams up with Cruising World and Sailing World Magazines for an in-depth look at Safety at Sea. This segment gives excellent detailed demonstrations of both Coast Guard approved and SOLAS rated devises including handheld flares, aerial flares and EPIRBs. Compare the differences and determine what equipment you want on board your boat. (502G) Buy the complete volume at https://youtu.be/a-99saxnhJY Also at... http://www.thesailingchannel.tv/seamanship-training-vol-2/ https://vimeo.com/ondemand/seamanship2
Visual Distress Signals VDSs
 
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A distress signal, also known as a distress call, is an internationally recognized means for obtaining help. Distress signals are communicated by transmitting radio signals, displaying a visually observable item or illumination, or making a sound audible from a distance. A distress signal indicates that a person or group of people, ship, aircraft, or other vehicle is threatened by serious and/or imminent danger and requires immediate assistance.[1]:PCG D−3 Use of distress signals in other circumstances may be against local or international law. An urgency signal is available to request assistance in less critical situations. In order for distress signalling to be the most effective, two parameters must be communicated: Alert or notification of a distress in progress Position or location (or localization or pinpointing) of the party in distress. For example, a single aerial flare alerts observers to the existence of a vessel in distress somewhere in the general direction of the flare sighting on the horizon but extinguishes within one minute or less. A hand-held flare burns for three minutes and can be used to localize or pinpoint more precisely the exact location or position of the party in trouble. An EPIRB both notifies or alerts authorities and at the same time provides position indication information. Distress can be indicated by any of the following officially sanctioned methods: • Transmitting a spoken voice Mayday message by radio over very high frequency channel 16 (156.8 MHz) and/or high frequency on 2182 kHz • Transmitting a digital distress signal by activating (or pressing) the distress button (or key) on a marine radio equipped with Digital Selective Calling (DSC) over the VHF (channel 70) and/or HF frequency bands. • Transmitting a digital distress signal by activating (or pressing) the distress button (or key) on an Inmarsat-C satellite internet device • Sending the Morse code group SOS (▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄) by light flashes or sounds • Burning a red flare (either hand-held or aerial parachute flare) • Launching distress rockets • Emitting orange smoke from a canister • Showing flames on the vessel (as from a burning tar barrel, oil barrel, etc.) • Raising and lowering slowly and repeatedly both arms outstretched to each side • Making a continuous sound with any fog-signalling apparatus • Firing a gun or other explosive signal at intervals of about a minute • Flying the international maritime signal flags NC • Displaying a visual signal consisting of a square flag having above or below it a ball or anything resembling a ball (round or circular in appearance) #SOS #VDSs #DistressSignals Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 1151 Marine Online
Flares, Smoke & Dyes : How to Use and Comparison: Boat Safety
 
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Join us as we discuss the assortment of boating safety visual distress flares, smoke and dyes. We explain their different uses and how to use them, and Capt Tom Kehlenbach owner of Seatow Central Connecticut gives us real live demonstrations with Orion Safety Products. We take the drone to the air to give an emergency aircraft's point of view. We compare the smoke device in parallel to the green dye from a "birds eye" perspective in Long Island Sound. We have the Old Saybrook Police department supporting the event as well. There are pistol launcher from 12gauge to 25 mm , parachute flares, orange smoke floating flares , green dyes, and handheld flares. The Solas handheld flare is compared to a typical USCG compliant handheld flare. Next episode will include the deployment of a valize style inflatable raft and discuss EPIRBS, and VHF radio procedures. ---------------------------GEAR WE USE----------------------------------------- The Doc spook-https://www.driftertackle.net/?ref=1337 Shimano Saragosa 6000 - http://amzn.to/2smvCpS Lamiglas Triflex- http://amzn.to/2t0Be9J G Loomis Pro Blue Rod- http://amzn.to/2smlptH Power Pro Super Slick-http://amzn.to/2r3kYjS Boga Grip-http://amzn.to/2sbOyrI Best clips to attach lure!- http://amzn.to/2rdRmPX Stormr Jacket- http://amzn.to/2smjq8o Stormr Bibs-http://amzn.to/2t2MtL1 Humminbird Solix 12- http://amzn.to/2sciAvg Minn Kotta Riptide Trolling Motor- http://amzn.to/2sbE8rV Hansom Pliers and sheath-http://amzn.to/2sbC17q Xtratuf short boots-http://amzn.to/2rdNYog Protect your face!-http://amzn.to/2s0AIUF Conventional reel mid price-http://amzn.to/2t0fhYk Sweet conventional reel-http://amzn.to/2t06Egi -------------------------FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA------------------------- https://www.facebook.com/AdventureStreamingGuys/ https://www.instagram.com/adventurestreamingguys/
Sound Signals - Boat Safety in NZ - Maritime New Zealand
 
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This video emphasizes the importance of and requirements for sound and visual distress signals on boats. Pyrotechnic and non-pyrotechnic devices are examples of day and nighttime visual distress signals.
Views: 5029 boatsafetyinnz
Conduct of Vessels in Restricted Visibility
 
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The learning objectives of the video are: The rule of the road when two vessels are meeting each other and the responsibility between these vessels in clear visibility and also in restricted visibility. Overtaking Rule 13 Head-on situation Rule 14 Crossing situation Rule 15 Actions by give-way and Stand on Vessel Rules 16 & 17 Responsibilities between Vessels Conduct of vessels in restricted visibility Distress Signals - Annex IV COLREG Rule 34 Warning Signals for Vessels In Sight Of Each Other https://youtu.be/dQ1VkgDt1x4 COLREG Rule 34 Signals When In Sight In A Narrow Channel https://youtu.be/8lOk46HFHe4 COLREG Rule 31 Seaplanes And WIG Craft https://youtu.be/7E5v1nSNmDk COLREG Rule 29 & Rule 35 Pilot Vessels On Duty https://youtu.be/HzVKJ9051dM COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Mine Clearing Operations https://youtu.be/1G23KnMi66Y COLREG Rule 27 Vessel Engaged In Dredging OR Underwater Operations https://youtu.be/Gfry8xTJiuE COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Restricted, But Not Mine Clearin https://youtu.be/OJpSE0cbB48 COLREG Rule 27 & Rule 35 Vessel Not Under Command https://youtu.be/8JflJu0Rd1k COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Trawling https://youtu.be/KEdFc53Czec COLREG Rule 26 & Rule 35 Fishing Vessel Engaged In Fishing Other Than Trawling https://youtu.be/n3PqV9rX7QA COLREG Rule 25 & Rule 35 Sailing Vessels and Vessels Under Oars https://youtu.be/z9rgrVvodZs COLREG Rule 24 Vessel Puching Ahead Or Rowing Other Vessels Alongside https://youtu.be/C1KE9IbQky8 COLREG Rule 24, Rule 27 And Rule 35 A Vessel Engaged In Towing https://youtu.be/kH1ZSgVhvdE COLREG Rule 23 & Rule 35 Power Driven Vessels https://youtu.be/0Jzo3AxowJU COLREG Rule 24 & Rule 35 A Vessel Being Towed https://youtu.be/jFSNvRtP3Ds COLREG Rule 21 & Annex 1 Light And Shapes https://youtu.be/m1Gmh2bJe9w COLREG Rule 20 & 32 Light And Shapes Signals https://youtu.be/P_WAz9cEYKo COLREG Rule 30 And Rule 35 A Vessel At Anchor https://youtu.be/DQz-TvHHobU COLREG Rule 30 A Vessel Aground https://youtu.be/v4FQt2NF6uk Don't Forget to subscribe US Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683
Views: 16370 Marine Online
Sea Kayak Navigation and Signaling Devices
 
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Sea Kayak Navigation is a critical skill for all sea kayakers to learn, and you need to have the right tools for the job. Sea Kayaking TV LEARN Check out all our Paddling TV YouTube channels: Kayak Fishing Tales http://www.youtube.com/user/KayakFishingTales Kayak Bass Fishing http://www.youtube.com/user/KayakBassinTV Stand Up Paddling http://www.youtube.com/user/StandUpPaddlingTV Whitewater Kayaking http://www.youtube.com/user/WhitewaterPaddlingTV Canoeing http://www.youtube.com/user/CanoeingTV Recreational Paddling http://www.youtube.com/user/PaddleTV Sea Kayaking http://www.youtube.com/user/SeaKayakingTV SHOP Need a boat? Shop the world's largest selection of canoes and kayaks at Appomattox River Company. Appomattox has served paddlers since 1977, and their staff of experts are serious paddlers, knowledgeable in all disciplines of paddlesports. Call them at 800 442 4837, or visit their website http://www.paddleva.com CLOTHING For 25 years ExOfficio has built top quality clothing that not only looks great, but that performs exceptionally well. ExOfficio clothing is simply made to adventure, and ExOfficio's Amphi line of clothing is ideal for paddling and other outdoor adventures. Check them out at http://www.exofficio.com STORAGE RACKS Even if you're on the water 2-hours every day, your boat will be in storage 90% of the time, and improperly stored boats are easily damaged. For the ultimate storage solution, check out Suspenz's indoor and outdoor storage racks for kayaks, canoes, SUPs and more. Visit the Suspenz website for more information http://wwwsuspenzkayakstorage.com KAYAKS For 30 years Necky and Old Town have designed world class kayaks with an approach that is streamlined, elegant, and purpose-built. Both Necky and Old Town are innovators in paddlesport designs who have played a large role in advancing the sport of kayaking. See their amazing boats at http://www.neckykayaks.com and http://www.oldtowncanoe.com PADDLES Notice how nearly every pro on Paddling TV uses an AquaBound paddle? There's a good reason for this. Aqua-Bound manufacturers some of the best paddles on the market, and they won't break your bank account. Having used them for 14 years we're happy to give them our stamp of approval. See their full line-up at http://www.aquabound.com PRODUCED BY Episode is produced by The Heliconia Press, an award winning TV, digital video, and DVD production company that specializes in outdoor pursuits. Visit http://www.helipress.com to find us online.
Views: 6964 SeaKayakingTV
COLREG Rule 20 & 32 Light And Shapes Signals
 
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COLREG Rule 20 & 32 Light And Shapes Signals Rule 20 - Application (a) Rules in this Part shall be complied with in all weathers. (b) The Rules concerning lights shall be complied with from sunset to sunrise, and during such times no other lights shall be exhibited, except such lights as cannot be mistaken for the lights specified in these Rules or do not impair their visibility or distinctive character, or interfere with the keeping of a proper lookout. (c) The lights prescribed by these Rules shall, if carried. also be exhibited from sunrise to sunset in restricted visibility and may be exhibited in all other circumstances when it is deemed necessary. (d) The Rules concerning shapes shall be complied with by day. (e) The lights and shapes specified in these Rules shall comply with the provisions of Annex I to these Regulations. Rule 32 - Sound signal definition PART 0. SOUND AND LIGHT SIGNALS - RULE 32 Definitions (a) The word “whistle” means any sound signaling appliance capable of producing the prescribed blasts and which compiles with the specifications in Annex III to these Regulations. (b) The term “short blast" means a blast of about one second's duration. (c) The term "prolonged blast“ means a blast of from four to six seconds' duration. Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 1827 Marine Online
How to signal at sea - Broll
 
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A short piece on flag semaphore. Flag semaphore is the telegraphy system used to convey information at a distance by means of visual signals with flags. This system is primarily used by the navy in case of a communications breakdown. Footage taken aboard the Romanian Navy ship Regele Ferdinand, a part of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2), which was taking part in a Passing Exercise in the Black Sea to increase interoperability between British, Romanian and Turkish naval forces. Credit: Courtesy
Views: 82 Got You
Navigation lights (part 2) I www.aceboater.com
 
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Every boat operator must know the rules that apply in the sharing of waterways, in order to safely navigate. When navigating at night or by restricted visibility, the operator must be able to recognize a boat by the color and positioning of its navigation lights to determine what actions to take to avoid a collision. According to the Collision regulations, an operator of a power driven pleasure craft of less than 12 metres in length, and underway, may display, from sunset to sunrise, in addition to sidelights (red -- green), an all-round white light. According to the Collision regulations an operator of a power driven pleasure craft of more than 12 metres in length, and underway, may display, from sunset to sunrise, a masthead light (white) forward, sidelights (red -- green), and a sternlight (white). The operator of a sailing pleasure craft underway shall, from sunset to sunrise, display sidelights (red - green) and a sternlight (white). A vessel engaged in fishing, other than trawling, shall display two all-around lights in a vertical line, the upper being red and the lower white. When making way through the water, it displays the sidelights and a sternlight. A vessel when engaged in trawling, which means dragging a dredge net or other fishing apparatus through the water, shall display two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being green and the lower white. When making way through the water, it displays sidelights and a sternlight. Stern view The operator of a sailing pleasure craft of less than 7 metres in length not under power (canoe, kayak), underway, shall from sunset to sunrise, display, if practical, sidelights and a sternlight, but if the operator cannot, he/she must have at hand, a flashlight or lighted lantern emitting a white light which must be lit in enough time to prevent a collision. At anchor, the operator of a pleasure craft shall display, from sunset to sunrise, in the fore part, an all-around white light. A power-driven vessel when towing shall show sidelights, a sternlight, and a towing light in a vertical line above the sternlight, and two masthead lights in a vertical line. When the length of the tow, measuring from the stern of the towing vessel to the after end of the tow exceeds 200 metres, three such lights in a vertical line shall be displayed. Apart from the regular navigation lights, when a boat tows another vessel in distress or in need of assitance for any reason, must take all possible measres to show the relation between the towed vessel and the vessel doing the towing. A vessel towing must try to shine a light on the towing cable to make it as visible as possible, so that other boats do not come into contact with the cable. A vessel or other structure under tow, if it is less than 25 metres wide, shall display one all-around white light. Any government vessel or any vessel that is owned or operated by a harbour, river, county or municipal police force may display a blue flashing light to identify itself as such, in the following cases • when it is providing assistance in any waters to any vessel or other craft; • when it is engaged in law enforcement duties in Canadian waters. A power-driven vessel, when pushing another, must display the sidelights, a sternlight, and two superimposed masthead lights. The vessel being pushed, and not part of a composite unit, must display its sidelights at the bow. When a vessel is pushing another, if both are connected in a rigid, composite unit, they will be regarded as one unit, thus showing the appropriate lights.
Views: 43417 Ace Boater
LIRR Train Dropping Signals at QUEENS Interlocking
 
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Here is a montage of LIRR trains taking various PRR position light signal indications at QUEENS interlocking. In the first clip an outbound train of M7 MU's passes an inbound train of M7's at Floral Park, just as the outbound train knocks the Approach Medium indication on the 42W signal. The 42W is fleeted and changes to a Stop and Proceed. Later that same train takes another Approach Medium on the 22W signal bridge while an inbound diesel hauled train powered by DM30 #510 takes the Clear indication on the 23W. Next an inbound Hempstead train departs the Bellrose station on an Approach indication displayed on the 22W, stopping short of the 12W at Stop. This later changes up Approach Medium in response to the route being lined to the inbound local track past the 2W, displaying Medium Clear. Finally an inbound Main Line MU train passes the 23W signal displaying Clear and makes a high speed diverging movement to the center express track.
Distress Signal Testing
 
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As sailors, we carry pyrotechnics on board—per U.S. Coast Guard and SOLAS regulations—and hope we'll never have to use them. In fact, it's illegal to use them, unless you're experiencing an actual emergency or have received permission from the proper local authorities.
Views: 26019 SAIL Magazine
Navy Stiletto using Signal Mate Navigation Lights
 
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The Stiletto fitted with the Signal Mate LED navigation lights. Our certified LED navigation lights are for harsh conditions and long life. Please visit www.signalmate.com for more information on our products.
Views: 376 Signal Mate
Signal Mate - How to do Sound & Light Signaling during Restricted Visibility
 
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The Signal Mate is an automatic horn and light controller for when a vessel is in restricted visibility and needs to do the required U.S.C.G. sound signals. We allow the sailor a choice to use just their horn or a light or both in automatic or manual operation. Please visit www.Signalmate.com for more information on our products.
Views: 348 Signal Mate
25   sound signals 2
 
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A vessel at anchor may in addition to the bell and/or gong, sound one short, one prolonged and one short blast to give warning of her position, and of the possibility of collision, to an approaching vessel. A vessel aground must ring the bell, and if required, sound the gong, and in addition, must ring three separate and distinct strokes on the bell immediately before and after the rapid ringing of the bell. A vessel of less than 12 meters in length is not obliged to give the previously described signals, but if she does not, shall make some other efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than 2 minutes. A pilot vessel when engaged on pilotage duty shall, in addition to the signals prescribed for power-driven vessels, sound an identity signal consisting of four short blasts.
Visual Distress Signals 2.9
 
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A visual distress signal is any device designed to show that your boat is in distress and help others locate you. A wide variety of signaling devices, both pyrotechnic and non-pyrotechnic, can be carried to meet the requirements of the regulation. Visual distress signals may only be used in emergency situations. Regulations require all recreational boats operating on U.S. coastal waters, including the Great Lakes, the territorial seas and those waters directly connected to the Great Lakes and the territorial seas, up to a point where the waters are less than two miles wide, and boats owned in the United States when operating on the high seas to be equipped with visual distress signals. The regulation states "No person in a boat shall display a visual distress signal on water to which this subpart applies under any circumstances except a situation where assistance is needed because of immediate or potential danger to the persons aboard."
Views: 24565 BOATERexam.com
Sea Scouts Demonstrate  Pyrothnic Visual Distress Signals
 
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As a community service project #seascouts collected over 100 expired flares from the boating community in Bay Village and demonstrated there use. It was an excellent training exercise and performed a worthwhile community service.
Views: 73 Mr Gash
The American Dollar - Signaling Through The Flames
 
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The American Dollar - Signaling Through The Flame Album: Free Winter 2010 Compilation theamericandollar.bandcamp.com Download a free compilation of their best tracks here:‬‬‬ ‪‪‪www.tinyurl.com/2bflc4m Picture From: www.flickr.com/people/tonjethilesenphotography
Views: 300946 minute2midnight
Two Power-Driven Vessels: Overtaking 5.4.1
 
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The overtaking vessel A is the give-way vessel. The other vessel B is the stand-on vessel. As the give-way vessel, A must take EARLY and SUBSTANTIAL action to keep clear of the stand-on vessel B. If both vessels are power-driven, sound signals are required. Vessel A must blow one short blast and alter course to starboard, or blow two short blasts and alter course to port, and Vessel B must return the same sound signal(s) to indicate understanding.
Views: 51196 BOATERexam.com
COLREG Rule 29 & Rule 35 Pilot Vessels On Duty
 
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Rule 29 Pilot vessels (a) A vessel engaged on pilotage duty shall exhibit: (i) at or near the masthead. two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being white and the lower red; (ii) when underway, in addition. sidelights and a stern light; (iii) when at anchor, in addition to the lights prescribed in sub-paragraph (i), the light, lights or shape prescribed in Rule 30 for vessels at anchor. (b) A pilot vessel when not engaged on pilotage duty shall exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed for a similar vessel of her length. Extract from Rule 35 Sound signals In restricted visibility In or near an area of restricted visibility, whether by day or night, the signals prescribed in this Rule shall be used as follows: (a) A power-driven vessel making way through the water shall sound at intervals of not more than 2 minutes one prolonged blast. (b) A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water shall sound at intervals of not more than 2 minutes two prolonged blasts in succession with an interval of about 2 seconds between them. (9) A vessel at anchor shall at intervals of not more than one minute ring the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds. In a vessel of 100 meters or more ln length the bell shall be sounded in the forepart of the vessel and immediately after the ringing of the bell the gong shall be sounded replay for about 5 seconds on the after part of the vessel. A vessel at anchor may in addition sound three blasts ln succession, namely one short, one prolonged and one short blast, to give Waring of her position and of the possibility of collusion to an approaching vessel. Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 1256 Marine Online
Signal Mate Boat Safety! Be Safe Be Seen Be Heard
 
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The Signal Mate keeps your boat & crew safe during restricted visibility & distress by synchronizing your horn and Anchor light. Be Seen & Heard! Please visit www.Signalmate.com for more information on our products.
Views: 85 Signal Mate
Navigation equipment I www.aceboater.com
 
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Sound-Signalling Devices or Sound-Signalling Appliance The sound-signalling device or the sound-signalling appliance is intended to signal and alert other boaters of your presence in restricted visibility and/or in emergency situation. Boats under 12 m (39'4") without a fitted sound-signalling appliance must carry a sound-signalling device. Unlike the sound-signalling device, the sound-signalling appliance is an integral part of the boat, is fixed on it and is in good working order. A sound-signalling device can be a pealess safety whistle, a compressed gas horn, an electric horn, a gong or a bell. Whistles with a pea inside are not regulatory as they will not work with water in them. Navigation Lights The navigation lights installed on the pleasure craft show which type of boat is on the water. While navigating at night or by restricted visibility, when you encounter another pleasure craft, the colour of the lights which are visible from the other pleasure craft will help you determine who has priority. You must be aware of the mandatory navigation lights that are required from sunset to sunrise. Navigation at night without navigation lights is dangerous to the other vessels in your immediate area.They must also be used in reduced (poor) visibility (ex: fog). Before heading out, make sure your vessel has the proper navigation lights, and that all lights are in working order. Other vessels depend on your navigation lights to avoid collisions. Navigation lights and shapes vary based on the type and length of your boat and the distance in which navigation lights can be seen is dependent on the size of the vessel. See Rule 22, set out in the Collision Regulations for more information. Radar Reflectors A radar reflector can enhance your safety on the water, but only if it's big enough and well placed on your boat. Reflectors help larger vessels spot smaller boats on their radar screens, which is often the only way to see you. When buying a reflector, there is no substitute for size — so buy the biggest one that is practical for your boat. Height is also very important, so also keep this in mind. Reflectors should be placed above all superstructures and at least 4 m (13'1") above the water if practical. There are all kinds of reflectors of varying quality on the market, so shop carefully before buying. Magnetic compass A magnetic compass will help the operator of a pleasure craft to find directions. The compass is essential to navigation especially when visibility is reduced. A magnetic compass is influenced by the proximity of metallic and/or electrical devices, which could provide inaccurate information. Furthermore, it is important to keep magnetic screwdrivers, key chains, flashlights and any other magnetic materials at a distance from the compass Charts Charts are graphic representations depicting areas of water, depicting the depths, underwater hazards, traffic routes, aids to navigation and adjacent coastal areas. They are intended primarily for mariners to assist navigation; and are published by the Canadian Hydrographic Service, Department of Fisheries and Oceans. They are used as navigational aids. Topographical Maps Topographical Maps are maps of the land area depicting natural and artificial features of the land, including elevation contours, shorelines, rocks, land features above water, and planimetrical
Views: 20293 Ace Boater
Send SOS Signal w/ Reflective Surface | Survival Skills
 
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Watch more How to Survive in the Wilderness videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/509706-Send-SOS-Signal-w-Reflective-Surface-Survival-Skills If you have to signal someone and the aircraft or someone that's distant on the horizon, one of the ways that you can use the sun to signal is by having a reflective surface. Right here, I have a mirror. You can also use something like a CD or DVD. That will give you enough shine to make a reflection. The way that I use my mirror is to shine onto my hand--I don't know if you can see that shining on my hand--that light is what's going to reflect wherever I aim. If I use my thumb and my forefinger or make a sight right here between my two fingers, I can take that sight and move it to wherever I want to shine. I can make that shine in the direction that I want to signal. If you were signaling an aircraft, you'd want to put the aircraft right here in your V and put the light on both sides of your fingers so you'd get that shine, and you'd be able to signal.
Views: 15432 Howcast
Homemade Tri Light Signal
 
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Tri lights were used by New York Central, Conrail, and more.
Views: 123 Shane's Trains57
US Coast Guard send blinker signals as task force advances during invasion...HD Stock Footage
 
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Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675056756_invasion-of-Iwo-Jima_Landing-Ship-Tank_naval-Quarter-Masters_blinker-signals_World-War-II Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. Two U.S. Coast Guard Quartermasters send blinker signals as the task force advances during the invasion of Iwo Jima, Japan. United States Coast Guard personnel during the invasion of Iwo Jima, Japan during World War 2. Two Coast Guard signalmen send red light blinker signals. The sun sets in the sea and yellowish sea water as seen from the ships of the task force. A Landing Ship Tank (LST) underway as seen from another naval vessel sailing in the sea. Location: Iwo Jima. Date: 1945. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.
Views: 285 CriticalPast
Ocean Survival Equipment- Nutnfancy
 
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Man overboard. Depending on where you are and how you are or are not prepared this might mean death. Here we look at west coast TNP Zodiac boat operations and how we prepared for this eventuality. Subject covered: hypothermia prevention, personal locator beacon signaling, mirror signaling, survival whistles, on-water flashlights, ocean survival vest organization and use, shark knives, utility knives, boat emergency supplies, tool selection, PFD choice, color selection, VHF marine radio selection, use of GPS, yachting lanyards, and more. Filmed on location on the Pacific coast dockside, if you play or work in water locations you might learn something here that can save your life in the water. Item purchase links, buy quick because they go out of date: ACR PLB-375 ResQLink+ Buoyant Personal Locator Beacon: http://amzn.to/2qlLG7u ACR 3971.3 Firefly Pro Water Activated LED Strobe: http://amzn.to/2puIzKj Four Sevens MMU-X3R Maelstrom flashlight: http://amzn.to/2qsnqzF Spyderco FB23PBBK Aqua Salt fixed blade knife: http://amzn.to/2puNBXj Spyderco Pacific Salt, black: http://amzn.to/2pLpiaq Spyderco Pacific Salt, yellow: http://amzn.to/2qihWez Fox 40 Sonik Blast CMG whistle: http://amzn.to/2qi5ETy Blue Force Gear Ten Speed CHEST Rig M4: http://amzn.to/2pLivxw Garmin eTrex 20 tiny handheld GPS unit: http://amzn.to/2qsIzK7 Columbia "Schooner" sun hat: http://amzn.to/2pLqV82 Casio Super Illuminator MTD1082D dive watch: http://amzn.to/2qm5U0H AND http://amzn.to/2pLqWc0 Boating compressed air horn: http://amzn.to/2pjS1Se Floating 10 mile LED signal strobe: http://amzn.to/2pk0WmK Uniden 5 Watt MHS75 VHF MARINE RADIO: http://amzn.to/2oY8VDp Oilght ST25 500 Lumen Cree XM-L2 AA flashlight (common battery): http://amzn.to/2qlWhz1 Olight S20R 18650 Cell flashlight w charger: http://amzn.to/2oVi6DR Klein zippered utility pouch for First Aid Kits (shown): http://amzn.to/2pk36Th
Views: 41538 nutnfancy
Rescue Laser Flares® and Rescue Laser Lights™
 
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A new era in signaling and locating devices at sea and outdoors. These Rescue Laser Flares® and Rescue Laser Lights™ offer solutions to the problems associated with traditional pyrotechnics. This short video clip shows you what these laser flares are about. Look on www.RemoteLifestyleSolutions.com for more details.
Views: 272 remotelifestyle
Signalman operating blinker light and other men aboard USS Sea Owl underway in th...HD Stock Footage
 
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Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675076104_USS-Sea-Owl_signalman-operates-blinker-light_motor-launch_tied-up-alongside-repair-ship Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. Signalman operating blinker light and other men aboard USS Sea Owl underway in the Pacific Ocean. USS Sea Owl underway in the Pacific Ocean. The submarine underway. Officer in the foreground. Signalman operating signal light. Lookout standing at the conning tower. Bow of the submarine. Water breaking over the surface of the submarine. Motor launch coming alongside USS Sea Owl at Saipan. Submarine tied up alongside repair ship in Saipan harbor. Location: Pacific Ocean. Date: May 19, 1945. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.
Views: 330 CriticalPast
Science Bulletins: Deep-Sea Cephalopods Hide Using Light
 
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Many kinds of octopus, cuttlefish, and squid are masters of disguise. They conceal themselves using chromatophores—specialized skin cells that hold pigment and reflect light. Cephalopods expand or contract these colored areas, rapidly shifting color or changing skin patterns to blend with their surroundings. A new study shows that even deep-sea dwellers use camouflage to their advantage. Two species—a squid and an octopus—are normally transparent, which makes them invisible to predators that look for silhouettes against surface light. But transparency can't protect them against ocean predators that use their own bioluminescence to illuminate transparent prey. Scientists tested the responses of the two cephalopods to light sources similar to the bioluminescence of deep-sea predators, and observed that the squid and octopus shifted quickly from transparent to opaque in response to this particular spectrum of light. These quick-change artists provide scientists with an important example of camouflage strategies in the ocean depths. This latest Bio Bulletin from the American Museum of Natural History's Science Bulletins program is on display in the Hall of Biodiversity until August 5, 2012. Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/. Related Links Mesopelagic Cephalopods Switch between Transparency and Pigmentation to Optimize Camouflage in the Deep http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982211011389 Duke University Biology Department: Research http://www.biology.duke.edu/research/index.html Tree of Life Web Project: Onychoteuthis banksii http://tolweb.org/Onychoteuthis_banksii/19962 Integrated Taxonomic Information System: Japetella heathi http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=82656 NOAA: What is bioluminescence? http://www.noaa.gov/features/02_monitoring/bioluminescence.html Creatures of Light http://ez-www.amnh.org/creatures-of-light
Watch: Fireflies Glowing in Sync to Attract Mates | National Geographic
 
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Each year in late spring the Great Smoky Mountains National Park hosts a special light show, thanks to a species of beetle native to the region. These are the synchronous fireflies, known for coordinating their flashes into bursts that ripple through a group of the insects. As with other fireflies, their yellowish glow helps potential mates find one another. READ: How Fireflies Glow (and What Really Turns Them On) http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/07/fireflies-lights-mating-behavior/ Get more facts about fireflies: http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/bugs/firefly/ PRODUCER/VIDEOGRAPHER: Fritz Faerber Additional Firefly Footage: Radim Schreiber http://fireflyexperience.org ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Watch: Fireflies Glowing in Sync to Attract Mates | National Geographic https://youtu.be/0BOjTMkyfIA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 389590 National Geographic
SOLAS Flares, Safety & Survival Boat Signaling Equipment
 
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- Red Handheld SOLAS Flare High-intensity signal burns 60 seconds at 15,000 candlepower High-intensity, short range emergency signal can be used day or night to help rescuers pinpoint your location. Easy to operate pull cord trigger system. Does not produce hot residue that can damage inflatable life rafts. Signal Type: Red hand flare Light Output: 15,000 candlepower Burn Time: 1 minute Deployment Method: Pull cord Type Approval: USCG, Transport Canada, SOLAS Replacement Interval: 42 months from manufacture date How Sold: Individually - Solas Parachute Rocket High-intensity signal burns 40 seconds at 30,000 candlepower Designed for day or night use, this long-range signal informs rescue vessels of your position. Reaches an altitude of over 984' (300m). Signal Type: Red rocket parachute Light Output: 30,000 candlepower Burn Time: 40 seconds Deployment Method: Self-contained trigger Type Approval: USCG, Transport Canada, SOLAS Replacement Interval: 42 months from manufacture date Sold Individually - Orange Floating Smoke SOLAS Signal- Creates a high-visibility cloud of orange smoke Help rescuers pinpoint your position during daytime emergencies. Floating canister delivers four minutes of a dense orange cloud. Signal Type: Smoke Burn Time: 4 minutes Deployment Method: Pull cord Type Approval: USCG (daytime), Transport Canada, SOLAS Replacement Interval: 42 months from manufacture date How Sold: Individually
Views: 30448 West Marine
Radiant Pro 2500 Underwater Video & Dive LED Light
 
01:30
The Radiant Pro 2500 Video Light is a durable and powerful video light, designed to significantly enhance color and light in underwater videos and still images. It offers a variety of advanced features for creative photographers. Featuring an ergonomic design and durable construction, the Radiant Pro 2500 Video Light can be comfortably integrated into any underwater photo system, such as with action cams, amphibious cameras, compact digital housings and more. A battery power indicator light around the power button enables easy monitoring of the battery power. The light makes use of 12 powerful LEDs, which provide an ultra bright, wide and even beam. Color temperature of the beam is warm and assists with producing vivid and colorful videos and still images without having to use any color correction filters. The Radiant Pro 2500 Video Light offers a variety of operation modes, which make the light suitable to light a wide range of classic and creative compositions. Operation modes include wide angle white light (120 degrees), narrow angle white light (15 degrees), red light, Ultra Violet (UV) & Blue light and two flashing modes (white and red) that can serve for signaling / SOS purposes. In the flashing modes the light can provide up to 8 hours of burn time (assuming the batteries are fully charged). A 3-level adjustable power output allows you to control the intensity of the light for various compositions and diving conditions, as well as extending the burn time of the light (the batteries will provide power for a considerably longer time when the light is set at lower intensity settings such as 50% or 25%). Finally, a “memory” function will return the light to the same setting as previously used before the light was last turned off. Depth rated to 100 meters/330 feet, the Radiant Pro 2500 Video Light fulfills the needs of both recreational and technical divers. Features & Specifications •Depth ratio: 100 meters / 330 feet •Maximum output: 2500 lumens •Beam angle: Wide, Red, UV & Blue and Flashing mode - 120 degrees Narrow mode - 15 degrees •Material: Aluminum head, Polycarbonate body •Battery: 2 x 18650 Li-ion batteries •Burn time: 50* minutes at 100% power * in optimal conditions •LED Lifespan: 35,000 hours •Color temperature: 5,300~5,600K •Operation modes: Wide - 100% / 50% / 25% power Narrow – 100% / 50% / 25% power Flashing (SOS) Red – 100% / 40% Flashing red UV (ultraviolet) & Blue •Battery power indicator: Green (100%-60% power) Yellow (60%-30% power) Red (30%-15% power) Flashing Red (15%-1% power) •Dimensions: 53 x 210 mm / 2 x 8 1/4 inch (diameter x length) •Weight: 376g (without batteries) •Included in package: Instruction manual, hand lanyard, Y-S connector, 4 x 18650 batteries, dual battery charger, 2 x replacement O-rings, silicone grease and rubber sleeve Further information - www.fantasea.com
Views: 4154 Fantasea Line
Kutterpullen 17.05.2008 5Hausen vs. Aqua Signal Lightning
 
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Internationales Kutterrennen zum Seefahrtschulfest Elsfleth am 17.05.2008 um ca. 15:10 Uhr. Das Rennen gegen Aqua Signal Lightning (aus Bremen) brachte uns mit einer Bootslänge Vorsprung in das Halbfinale gegen das Team Kakerlake der Seefahrtschule Elsfleth.
Views: 567 5hauser
my new train tronics signal (2-aspect red/green)
 
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my new train tronics signal (2-aspect red/green)
Views: 721 Ryan Bond
International Code of Flag Signals - Self Testing
 
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More tools on http://allships.com.au International Code of Flag Signals self-testing video slides for helping you to prepare for coxswain/master exams and orals. Just guess the object and wait for answer.
Views: 11054 Femaso